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Full TitleNew York State Assembly Bill 5801California State Assembly Bill 842AMERIPEN Financing Principles and Objectives for Advancing Packaging Recycling in the U.S.Consumer Brands Association (CBA) Position on the Optimal Recycling SystemConsumer Goods Forum (CGF) Position on Optimal Extended Producer ResponsibilityEllen MacArthur Foundation Position Paper on EPRVermont House Bill 142Washington State House Bill 1118Hawaii State House Bill 1316Hawaii State House Bill 1316-HD1Oregon State House Bill 2065Oregon State House Bill 2592Maryland House Bill 36Massachusetts House Docket 1553U.S. House Resolution 2238 "Break Free From Plastic Pollution Act of 2021"Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) Position on Product StewardshipMaine Legislative Document 1471Maine Legislative Document 1541Maine Legislative Document 1541 ANational Waste and Recycling Association (NWRA) Policy Position on Extended Producer ResponsibilityProduct Stewardship Institute (PSI) and Flexible Packaging Association (FPA) Shared Elements of EPR Legislation for Packaging and Paper Products (PPP) New York State Senate Bill 1185New York State Senate Bill 1185ANew York State Senate Bill 1185BNew York State Senate Bill 1185COregon State Senate Bill 14Hawaii State Senate Bill 1419New Jersey Senate Bill 3853Washington State Senate Bill 5022Washington State Senate Bill 5022-SWashington State Senate Bill 5022-S2.ECalifornia State Senate Bill 54Oregon State Senate Bill 582Oregon State Senate Bill 582AOregon State Senate Bill 582BSustainable Food Policy Alliance: Packaging and Recycling Policy PrioritiesThe Recycling Partnership (TRP) Accelerating RecyclingU.S. Plastics Pact Roadmap to 2025
LocationNew YorkCaliforniaUnited StatesUnited States GlobalGlobalVermontWashingtonHawaiiHawaiiOregonOregonMarylandMassachusettsUnited StatesUnited StatesMaineMaineMaineUnited StatesUnited StatesNew YorkNew YorkNew YorkNew YorkOregonHawaiiNew JerseyWashingtonWashingtonWashingtonCaliforniaOregonOregonOregonUnited StatesUnited StatesUnited States
Date2021-02-052021-03-222020-05-192020-04-162020-12-082021-06-152021-01-272021-01-112021-01-272021-02-212021-01-112021-01-112021-01-132021-03-292021-03-252021-07-162021-04-142021-04-222021-06-142021-06-302020-12-072021-01-082021-01-272021-03-102021-05-192021-01-112021-01-272021-06-012021-01-112021-02-032021-03-022020-12-072021-01-112021-04-162021-08-062020-07-022020-09-302021-06-15
TypeBillBillPolicy PositionPolicy PositionPolicy PositionPolicy PositionBillBillBillBillBillBillBillBillBillPolicy PositionBillBillBillPolicy PositionPolicy PositionBillBillBillBillBillBillBillBillBillBillBillBillBillBillPolicy PositionPolicy PositionPolicy Position
VersionA5801AB842AMERIPENCBACGFEMFH142HB1118HB1316HB1316-HD1HB2065HB2592HB36HD1553HR2238ISRILD1471LD1541LD1541ANWRAPSI_FPAS1185S1185AS1185BS1185CSB14SB1419SB 3853SB5022SB5022SSB5022S2ESB54SB582SB582ASB582BSFPATRPUSPP_2025
Current VersionYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesNoYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesNoYesYesYesNoNoNoYesYesYesYesNoNoYesYesNoNoYesYesYesYes
StatusIntroducedAmendedIntroducedIntroducedIntroducedIntroducedIntroducedIntroducedAmendedFailedFailedFailedFailedIntroducedAmendedIntroducedFailedAmendedPassedIntroducedIntroducedAmendedAmendedAmendedAmendedFailedFailedIntroducedAmendedAmendedPassedIntroducedAmendedAmendedPassedIntroducedIntroducedIntroduced
Passed Without EPR LanguageYes
Linkhttps://www.nysenate.gov/legislation/bills/2021/A5801https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=202120220AB842https://cdn.ymaws.com/www.ameripen.org/resource/resmgr/docs/AMERIPEN_-_Advancing_and_Fin.pdfhttps://consumerbrandsassociation.org/sustainability/recycling-policy-platform/https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/EPR-Building-a-Circular-Economy-for-Plastic-Packaging-cgf-plastic-waste.pdfhttps://plastics.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/epr%23Position-paperhttps://legislature.vermont.gov/bill/status/2022/H.142https://app.leg.wa.gov/billsummary?BillNumber=1118&Chamber=House&Year=2021https://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/measure_indiv.aspx?billtype=HB&billnumber=1316https://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/measure_indiv.aspx?billtype=HB&billnumber=1316https://olis.oregonlegislature.gov/liz/2021R1/Measures/Overview/HB2065https://olis.oregonlegislature.gov/liz/2021R1/Measures/Overview/HB2592https://mgaleg.maryland.gov/mgawebsite/Legislation/Details/hb0036?ys=2021RShttps://malegislature.gov/Bills/192/HD1553https://www.congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/house-bill/2238https://www.isri.org/docs/default-source/policy-position-statements/isri-position-on-product-stewardship052c0a1f8fb866e3af13ff0000e99eee.pdf?sfvrsn=77a06212_4http://legislature.maine.gov/legis/bills/display_ps.asp?PID=1456&snum=130&paper=&paperld=l&ld=1471http://www.mainelegislature.org/legis/bills/display_ps.asp?ld=1541&PID=1456&snum=130http://www.mainelegislature.org/legis/bills/display_ps.asp?ld=1541&PID=1456&snum=130https://wasterecycling.org/extended-producer-responsibility/https://cdn.ymaws.com/www.productstewardship.us/resource/resmgr/fpa/FPA-PSI-2020-DialogueSummary.pdfhttps://www.nysenate.gov/legislation/bills/2021/s1185https://www.nysenate.gov/legislation/bills/2021/s1185https://www.nysenate.gov/legislation/bills/2021/s1185https://www.nysenate.gov/legislation/bills/2021/s1185https://olis.oregonlegislature.gov/liz/2021R1/Measures/Overview/SB14https://capitol.hawaii.gov/measure_indiv.aspx?billtype=SB&billnumber=1419&year=2021https://www.njleg.state.nj.us/bills/BillView.asp?BillNumber=S3853https://app.leg.wa.gov/billsummary?BillNumber=5022&Year=2021&Initiative=falsehttps://app.leg.wa.gov/billsummary?BillNumber=5022&Year=2021&Initiative=falsehttps://app.leg.wa.gov/billsummary?BillNumber=5022&Year=2021&Initiative=falsehttps://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=202120220SB54https://olis.oregonlegislature.gov/liz/2021R1/Measures/Overview/SB582https://olis.oregonlegislature.gov/liz/2021R1/Measures/Overview/SB582https://olis.oregonlegislature.gov/liz/2021R1/Measures/Overview/SB582https://foodpolicyalliance.org/app/uploads/2020/07/sfpa-packaging-recycling-policy-priorities-june-2020.pdfhttps://recyclingpartnership.org/accelerator-policy/https://usplasticspact.org/roadmap-reader/
SummaryNew York State Assembly Bill 5801 is the companion bill to S1185. This bill details the development of a producer responsibility program for packaging and paper products. Under this program, producers are required to implement a producer responsibility plan, either individually or as a Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO).California State Assembly Bill 842 was introduced at the beginning of the 2021 Regular Session. This bill details the development of the Plastic Packaging Source Reduction and Recycling Stewardship Program, which would require producers of single-use plastic packaging and products to form a stewardship organization. The legislation would also require all single-use plastic packaging and products sold in the state to contain recycled content and be able to be easily recycled in the state, as defined by the state.In 2020, the American Institute for Packaging and the Environment (AMERIPEN) released a policy position on Advancing Packaging Recycling. The document outlines key principles identified by the organization for financing the framework for packaging recovery. These principles are Reliable, Efficient & Effective, and Equitable & Fair. The position also includes seven objectives to address the gaps in current packaging recovery efforts. AMERIPEN recommends a portfolio approach that incorporates a systems perspective, utilizes complementary funding and policy, and maximizes the strengths of various stakeholders. This position does not explicitly reference EPR, but proposes principles and objectives necessary for successful recycling system financing. "Achieving America's Recycling Future: CBA Position on the Optimal Recycling System" is a three-element national solution to improve recycling. The plan recommends establishing a standardized foundation, financing a lasting system, and strengthening end markets to meet demand. The financing section includes policy aspects that they may support. CBA is open to a variety of dedicated funding options provided funding goes exclusively to clearly defined, long-term solution that includes standardization.The position specifies that funding must be exclusively dedicated to consumer education, improving the recycling system, and enhancing recycling infrastructure. The policy recommendations include some similarities to elements of EPR, as well as additional policy levers.The Consumer Goods Forum (CGF) released global principles and parameters for EPR policies to serve as a starting point for policy discussion. The principles and parameters are designed for global application and encourage industry participation in the development and improvement of these EPR programs. The included aspects of EPR design are intended to inform the development of EPR programs. CGF states that these principles reflect critical components of optimal EPR but are not exhaustive.The Ellen MacArthur Foundation (EMF) released a publication titled "Extended Producer Responsibility: A Necessary Part of the Solution to Packaging Waste and Pollution." Thi publication includes a statement by key stakeholders and a position paper from EMF. The statement is in strong support of the implementation of EPR programs for packaging, and is signed by over 100 companies and organizations throughout the packaging value chain. The position paper, while not necessarily endorsed by the signatories of the statement, expands on the need for EPR and strongly supports EPR as a funding mechanism to contribute to the circular economy for packaging. The paper does not propose a specific policy nor provide recommendations on how to design or implement programs. However, it does include several key elements that EMF feels are essential considerations for EPR schemes.Vermont House Bill 142 was introduced at the beginning of the 2021 session. H142 proposes a stewardship program for packaging and paper products. The bill defines a covered entity as any person presenting covered material for collection. Under this proposed regulation, responsible parties must join a stewardship organization. If there are multiple stewardship organizations, they must work together to submit a single plan.Washington State House Bill 1118 was introduced at the beginning of the 2021 Regular Session. The proposed legislation sets forth guidelines for a statewide extended producer responsibility program that covers packaging and paper products (PPP). HB1118 is a companion bill to SB5022, which was amended to remove the EPR language and subsequently passed. HB1118 was referred to the Environment and Energy Committee but did not progress further during the regular session.Hawaii House Bill 1316 details the requirement for producers to assume responsibility for packaging, paper products, and beverage containers. HB 1316 was amended (HD1) to remove EPR program details and instead proposes funding to conduct a study on the benefits and costs to implement EPR in the state. The bill also includes proposal to prohibit full-service restaurants from offering single-use service ware unless requested. Additionally, it requires minimum post-consumer recycled content in plastic beverage containers sold in the state. HB 1316-HD1 was referred to committee and did not advance prior to the 2021 regular session adjourning.Hawaii House Bill 1316 details the requirement for producers to assume responsibility for packaging, paper products, and beverage containers. HB 1316 was amended (HD1) to remove EPR program details and instead proposes funding to conduct a study on the benefits and costs to implement EPR in the state. The bill also includes proposal to prohibit full-service restaurants from offering single-use service ware unless requested. Additionally, it requires minimum post-consumer recycled content in plastic beverage containers sold in the state. HB 1316-HD1 was referred to committee and did not advance prior to the 2021 regular session adjourning.Oregon House Bill 2065 was introduced at the beginning of the 2021 Regular Session. The bill proposes extended producer responsibility for packaging and paper products. The legislation requires producers of covered products to join a producer responsibility organization (PRO) unless exempt. The PRO is required to submit a program plan to Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). The legislation also directs the PRO to reimburse local governments for certain expenses and DEQ to establish a uniform statewide collection list. HB2065 was referred to committee and did not advance prior to adjournment of the regular session.Oregon State House Bill 2592 was introduced at the beginning of the 2021 Regular Session. This bill details the requirement of a producer responsibility program for packaging, food serviceware, and printing and writing paper. Under this program, producers are required to implement a producer responsibility plan, either individually or as a producer responsibility organization (PRO). This bill also prohibits the sale of products that make deceptive or misleading claims about recyclability, which is defined in the bill. HB 2592 was referred to committee and did not advance prior to adjournment of the regular session.Maryland House Bill 36 was introduced at the beginning of the 2021 Regular Session. The bill proposes extended producer responsibility for packaging, containers, and paper products. The legislation requires producers to form a stewardship organization, but is less detailed about specifics of the stewardship program. The bill states that certain aspects that must be addressed within the stewardship plan, but does not prescribe detailed implementation methods. The sponsor of bill has stated that these details deserve more thought and discussion than can fit into house session, and should instead be developed thoughtfully over the allotted time period by producers and stakeholders. Maryland HB 36 was referred to committee and did not advance prior to the 2021 regular session adjourning.Massachusetts House Docket 1553 was introduced at the beginning of the 2021 Regular Session. This bill details the development of a producer responsibility program for all packaging and paper products. Under this program, producers are required to implement a producer responsibility plan, either individually or as a producer responsibility organization (PRO).U.S. House Resolution 2238 was introduced in Congress on 3/25/21. Also known as the Break Free from Plastic Pollution Act (BFFPA) of 2021, this bill has a significant EPR component. Under this legislation, producers of covered products and beverage containers would be required to join product-specific producer responsibility organizations (PROs) to implement a product stewardship plan. There are many other policy levers introduced in the bill, to include a national bottle deposit program, a ban on certain single-use plastic products, and recycled content minimums.ISRI released an updated policy position on product stewardship in July 2021. This policy position states that "ISRI does not support product stewardship policies that disrupt the current recycling infrastructure, such as extended producer responsibility programs that either target, include, or disrupt the recycling of materials or products that are being successfully recycled and consumed in existing markets". Rather, ISRI would like to see policies that encourage the use of recycled material in manufacturing and products and increase the recyclability of products through design. The position also includes a preference for temporary-only policies that adjust to markets and demand, including support for collection mechanisms for hard to recycle products and compensation for municipalities for difficult to recycle items. Furthermore, ISRI seeks a "seat at the table" if there are discussions at the state level on Producer Responsibility Organizations (PROs).Maine Legislative Document 1471 (Senate Paper 474) was introduced in the first special session of the 2021 Maine Legislature. The bill proposes to establish a stewardship program for packaging. The program would provide funding to municipalities for recycling program operations based on a statewide needs assessment. The program would be structured to award grants for market development, infrastructure improvement, and consumer education.Maine Legislative Document 1541 (House Paper 1146) was introduced in the first special session of the 2021 Maine Legislature. The bill proposes the establishment of a stewardship program for packaging materials. Under this regulation, the state would enter into a contract with a stewardship organization, which would be responsible for implementing the program. The bill authorizes the state to determine the rules for fees paid by producers which would go towards reimbursing municipalities for operational costs of managing covered packaging materials. The bill was amended on 6/14/21 and passed in the state senate and house. The amendments include the addition of a needs assessment, the exclusion of certain drug and medical products from coverage, and the removal of litter cleanup and abatement from cost coverage.Maine Legislative Document 1541 (House Paper 1146) was introduced in the first special session of the 2021 Maine Legislature. The bill proposes the establishment of a stewardship program for packaging materials. Under this regulation, the state would enter into a contract with a stewardship organization, which would be responsible for implementing the program. The bill authorizes the state to determine the rules for fees paid by producers which would go towards reimbursing municipalities for operational costs of managing covered packaging materials. The bill was amended on 6/14/21 and passed in the state senate and house. The amendments include the addition of a needs assessment and the removal of litter cleanup and abatement from cost coverage. The bill was signed into law on 7/12/21.The National Waste and Recycling Association updated its policy position on extended producer responsibility in June 2021. The NWRA believes there are currently five major issues facing recycling in the United States: insufficient demand for some recyclables, low prices for the combined recycling stream, consumer behavior challenges, public concern over plastic in the environment, and inexpensive virgin resources. The NWRA believes policy to correct recycling challenges should incentivize demand for recyclables, not only focus on the supply side of the markets. Policy that supports creating "demand by requiring packaging to have post-consumer recycled content" is endorsed by NWRA. In situations where this policy approach is not enough, NWRA may consider supporting EPR. This position outlines which elements NWRA supports if EPR is proposed.The "Shared Elements of EPR Legislation for Packaging and Paper Products (PPP)" is an agreement between Product Stewardship Institute (PSI) and the Flexible Packaging Association (FPA) (and FPA's members) on eight key elements of EPR policy for packaging and paper products. The document presents positions on certain elements of EPR that both organizations agree on and describes how these elements would best be implemented in state EPR legislation.New York State Senate Bill 1185 was introduced at the beginning of the 2021 Regular Session. This bill details the development of a producer responsibility program for packaging and paper products. Under this program, producers are required to implement a producer responsibility plan, either individually or as a producer responsibility organization (PRO).New York State Senate Bill 1185A details the development of a producer responsibility program for packaging and paper products. Under this program, producers are required to implement a producer responsibility plan, either individually or as a Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO). The bill was amended on January 27th, 2021. This version, S1185A, expands the language in several sections for clarity and specificity. The amendments include the requirement for a detailed description of how stakeholders were consulted and a requirement to invest in recycling and reuse infrastructure.New York State Senate Bill 1185B details the development of a producer responsibility program for packaging and paper products. Under this program, producers are required to implement a producer responsibility plan, either individually or as a Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO). The bill was first, amended on January 27th, 2021. The bill was further amended on March 10th, 2021. This version, S1185B, requires the establishment of a stakeholder advisory board to review plans prior to submission to the state. The date of implementation was changed from 3 years to 4 years, and a statewide needs assessment must be conducted prior to implementation. The amendments also include a change to the definition of readily-recyclable, additional exclusions, and language requiring the PRO to provide service should a municipality elect not to.New York State Senate Bill 1185C details the development of a producer responsibility program for packaging, paper products, and single-use plastics. Under this program, producers are required to implement a producer responsibility plan, either individually or as a Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO). The bill was first, amended on January 27th, 2021. The bill was further amended on March 10th, 2021, and May 19th, 2021. This version, S1185C, specifies the inclusion of certain single-use plastic items (i.e. straws, utensils, cups) and excludes a larger variety of paper products (periodical, magazines, and newspapers) as covered materials or products. This version removes the advertiser exemption option introduced in the previous version. The amendments also add a public health specialist and producer to the stakeholder advisory board.Oregon State Senate Bill 14 was introduced at the beginning of the 2021 Regular Session. This bill details the development of a stewardship organization and a plastic stewardship program that covers plastic packaging and plastic food serviceware. SB14 was referred to committee and did not advance prior to adjournment of the regular session.Hawaii Senate Bill 1419 was introduced at the beginning of the 2021 session. SB 1419 establishes a municipal product stewardship program to shift the costs of paying for solid waste disposal and recycling from the municipality to product manufacturers. SB 1419 was referred to committee and did not advance prior to the 2021 regular session adjourning.New Jersey State Senate Bill 3853 was introduced in the middle of the 2021 Regular Session. This bill details the development of a packaging product stewardship program, which would require producers of packaging and food serviceware to form a stewardship organization.Washington Senate Bill 5022 was introduced at the beginning of the 2021 Regular Session. The proposed legislation sets forth guidelines for a statewide extended producer responsibility program that covers packaging and paper products (PPP). The bill was amended on 2/3/21, to remove the EPR language. The first substitute, SB5022-S, focused on expanded polystyrene prohibitions, disposable food serviceware in restaurants, and recycled content requirements for beverage containers. The bill was further amended on 3/2/21, SB5022-SE, to include recycled content minimums for plastic trash bags, as well as household cleaning and personal care product containers.Washington Senate Bill 5022 was introduced at the beginning of the 2021 Regular Session. The proposed legislation sets forth guidelines for a statewide extended producer responsibility program that covers packaging and paper products (PPP). The bill was amended on 2/3/21, to remove the EPR language. The first substitute, SB5022-S, focused on expanded polystyrene prohibitions, disposable food serviceware in restaurants, and recycled content requirements for beverage containers. The bill was further amended on 3/2/21, SB5022-SE, to include recycled content minimums for plastic trash bags, as well as household cleaning and personal care product containers. The State of Washington Senate Bill 5022 was introduced at the beginning of the 2021 Regular Session. The proposed legislation sets forth guidelines for a state-wide Extended Producer Responsibility program that covers packaging and paper products (PPP). The bill was amended on 2/3/21, to remove the EPR language. The new bill substitute focuses on expanded polystyrene prohibitions, disposable food serviceware in restaurants, and recycled content requirements for beverage containers. The bill was further amended on 3/2/21 to include recycled content minimums for plastic trash bags and household cleaning and personal care product containers.California Senate Bill 54 is a declaration of intent to enact a Plastic Pollution Producer Responsibility Act. The bill cites plastic production rates, ocean pollution issues, recycling rates, and a shift in global waste markets as reason for needing to enact a solution. The bill further references environmental and human health concerns, drinking water contamination, and the cost to local governments for clean up efforts. The legislation states that businesses that sell in the state have a responsibility over the packaging and product waste that is produced, including the costs of recovery. The bill stipulates that all disposable packaging should be recyclable or compostable. This bill will be monitored and the forthcoming Plastic Pollution Producer Responsibility Act will be analyzed when amended.Oregon State Senate Bill 582 was introduced at the beginning of the 2021 Regular Session. This bill originally proposed directing the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to study and make recommendations for modernizing Oregon's recycling system. The bill would require the results of the study and recommendations to be provided to the Legislative Assembly by September 15, 2022. This bill was later expanded upon to include significantly more detail concerning the development and implementation of an EPR program.Oregon State Senate Bill 582 was introduced at the beginning of the 2021 Regular Session. This bill details the development of a producer responsibility program for packaging, food serviceware, and printing and writing paper. Under this program, producers are required to implement a producer responsibility plan, either individually or as a producer responsibility organization (PRO). The bill directs the Department of Environmental Quality to establish a statewide collection list for recyclable materials.Oregon State Senate Bill 582 was introduced at the beginning of the 2021 Regular Session. The bill was amended on 4/16/21 and 6/21/21. This version, SB 582 B-Engrossed, specifies changes to the recycling rate, size of a small producer, and adds toxic or hazardous packaged products to the exceptions. This version requires DEQ to complete a multifamily needs assessment, an equity study, federal law evaluation, litter and marine debris needs assessment, and a compostability study of covered products. The amendments also add 2 members of the Oregon legislature to the stakeholder advisory board. This bill details the development of a producer responsibility program for packaging, food serviceware, and printing and writing paper. Under this program, producers are required to implement a producer responsibility plan, either individually or as a producer responsibility organization (PRO). The bill directs the Department of Environmental Quality to establish a statewide collection list for recyclable materials. The bill was signed into law on 8/6/21.The Sustainable Food Policy Alliance (SPFA) released a position on "Packaging and Recycling Policy Priorities" in 2020. The position indicates three aspects of policy solutions that SFPA members support. These are 1) Improve access to recycling, 2) Transform waste management to a circular system, and 3) Establish consistent standards and enhance measurement. The position indicates areas of focus for state and local governments, supports the establishment of a public-private partnership, and emphasizes the importance of consistent standards for accepted materials. This position does not explicitly reference EPR, but indicates support for policy that includes similar elements.The Recycling Partnership, through the work of the Circular Economy Accelerator, released a policy position on recycling system financing. "Accelerating Recycling: Policy to Unlock Supply for the Circular Economy" proposes a dual policy approach. The approach includes a Packaging and Printed Paper Fee paid by private-sector brands to support residential recycling infrastructure and education, and a Disposal Surcharge on waste generators to help defray recycling operational costs for communities. The position recommends the establishment of a Packaging and Printed Paper Stewardship Organization (PSO). The PSO would work to address infrastructure and education improvements, but would not operate local recycling programs nor fund the operational expenditures of those programs. This position does not explicitly reference EPR, but proposes an alternative system of financing that includes elements of EPR.The U.S. Plastics Pact (USPP) released a Roadmap to 2025, which lays out the key activities necessary to achieve the four targets of the USPP by 2025. The roadmap does not go into much detail beyond identifying policy considerations as key activities, but it states support for EPR and indicates several elements which are necessary to include in policy development. Several key outcomes include the development of a clear position from the U.S. Plastics Pact on policy approaches, which will be forthcoming.
Covered Products
All Packaging TypesCovered materials and products are defined as any part of a package or container, regardless of recyclability or compostability, that includes material used for containment, protection, handling, delivery, and presentation of goods that are sold, offered for sale, or distributed in the state. Containers and packaging are further defined to include paper, cartons, plastic, glass, metal, or combinations used secondary and tertiary packaging, and intended for short-term or single use.This position supports the collection of all major consumer goods packaging materials (all plastics, fibers, glass, and metals).EMF emphasizes the importance of clearly defining what is considered ‘packaging’. The position states that it is important to ensure that the scope of covered packaging is comprehensive, both in terms of packaging types (such as bottles, cans, flexibles, etc.) and materials (such as paper, glass, aluminum, regular and compostable plastics, etc.). The comprehensive approach will ensure a robust system and avoid potential unintended consequences of isolating materials.Packaging is defined as any containers or materials used for the containment, protection, handling, delivery, and presentation of goods. The term packaging includes: 1. Packaging intended for the consumer market. 2. Service packaging used or filled at the point of sale (carry-out bags, bulk good bags, delivery food service packaging). 3. Secondary packaging used to group products for multi-unit sale. 3. Tertiary packaging used for transportation or distribution directly to a consumer. 4. Additional elements attached to a product for display function.Packaging is defined as any material, substance, or object used to protect, contain, transport, or serve a product or sold for such purposes. The definition also includes materials attached for marketing or communication purposes. Products supplied at point of sale to facilitate the delivery of goods or the consumption of food or beverage are also covered.Packaging is defined as a material that is: 1. Used to protect, contain, transport, or serve a product. 2. Sold or supplied to consumers expressly for the purpose of protecting, containing, transporting, or serving products. 3. Attached to a product or its container for the purpose of marketing or communicating information about the product. 4. Supplied at the point of sale to facilitate the delivery of goods. 5. Supplied to or purchased by consumers expressly for the purpose of facilitating food or beverage consumption and ordinarily disposed of after a single use or short-term use, whether or not it could be reused.Packaging is defined as materials used for the containment or protection of products. The bill specifies single-use bags, take-out containers, storage, shipping or moving materials, printing and writing paper, food serviceware, aluminium foil and pie plates.Covered products includes all packaging, printing and writing paper and food serviceware intended for single use like paper or plastic plates, cups, bowls, cutlery, straws, pie plates, and aluminum foil. Covered materials and products include any part of a package or container, material used for containment, protection, handling, delivery, and presentation. This includes primary, secondary, and tertiary packaging intended for the consumer market, and service packaging designed and intended to be filled at the point of sale (i.e. carry out bags, take-out food service packaging).Covered materials include any part of a package or container, including material that is used for the containment, protection, handling, delivery, and presentation of a product that is sold, offered for sale, imported, or distributed in the state, including through internet transactions.Covered products include packaging, which is defined as any package or container and any part used for protection, handling, delivery, or presentation. It also includes service packaging at point of sale, secondary packaging, and tertiary packaging.Packaging material is defined as the material used for the containment, protection, delivery, presentation, or distribution of a covered product at the time the product is received by the consumer at a retail location in or at the consumer's residence. A covered product is a product that is sold, offered for sale, or distributed for sale in or into the state contained, protected, delivered, presented, or distributed in or using packaging material.Packaging material is defined as a material used for the containment, protection, delivery, presentation, or distribution of a product at the time that the product leaves a point of sale with or is received by the consumer of the product.Packaging material is defined as a material used for the containment, protection, delivery, presentation, or distribution of a product at the time that the product leaves a point of sale with or is received by the consumer of the product. The definition of packaging should be defined by its functions (containment and/or protection). Covered packaging should include consumer-facing primary, secondary, or tertiary packaging, and service packaging designed and intended to be filled at the point of sale. Covered materials should include all packaging products regardless of recyclability.Covered materials and products are defined as any part of a package or container, regardless of recyclability or compostability, that includes material used for containment, protection, handling, delivery, and presentation of goods that are sold, offered for sale, or distributed in the state. Containers and packaging are further defined to include paper, cartons, plastic, glass, metal, or combinations used secondary and tertiary packaging, and intended for short-term or single use.Covered materials and products are defined as any part of a package or container, regardless of recyclability or compostability, that includes material used for containment, protection, handling, delivery, and presentation of goods that are sold, offered for sale, or distributed in the state. Containers and packaging are further defined to include paper, cartons, plastic, glass, metal, or combinations used secondary and tertiary packaging, and intended for short-term or single use.Covered materials and products are defined as any part of a package or container, regardless of recyclability or compostability, that includes material used for containment, protection, handling, delivery, and presentation of goods that are sold, offered for sale, or distributed in the state. Containers and packaging are further defined to include paper, cartons, plastic, glass, metal, or combinations used secondary and tertiary packaging, and intended for short-term or single use.Containers and packaging are any part of a package or container, regardless of recyclability or compostability, that includes material used for containment, protection, handling, delivery, and presentation of goods that are sold, offered for sale, or distributed in the state. Containers and packaging are further defined to include paper, cartons, plastic, glass, metal, or combinations used secondary and tertiary packaging, and intended for short-term or single use.Covered materials and products are defined as any part of a package or container, including material that is used for the containment, protection, handling, delivery, and presentation of a product that is sold, offered for sale, imported, or distributed in the state. This includes primary, secondary, and tertiary packaging intended for the consumer market, service packaging designed and intended to be filled at the point of sale, and prescription bottles.Packaging product is defined as any product or material that is designed and used for the containment, protection, handling, delivery, or presentation of another product, including, but not limited to, a food or beverage item, and that is sold, offered for sale, imported, or distributed in the state. This includes primary, secondary, and tertiary packaging, food serviceware, bags, and includes materials like paper, plastic, glass, metal, a mixture thereof, or any other material, which serves a packaging function.Packaging is defined as any material, substance, or object used to protect, contain, transport, or serve a product or sold for such purposes. The definition also includes materials attached for marketing or communication purposes. Products supplied at point of sale to facilitate the delivery of goods or the consumption of food or beverage are also covered.Packaging is defined as materials used for the containment or protection of products. It includes paper, plastic, glass or metal, or a mixture. Single-use bags are included but not limited to shopping bags. Nondurable materials used in storage, shipping, or moving, such as packing materials, moving boxes, file boxes, and folders are also included. However, specialty packaging items only used in industrial or manufacturing processes are excluded. Food serviceware includes paper or plastic plates, wraps, cups, bowls, pizza boxes, cutlery, straws, lids, bags, aluminum foil, or clamshells or similar containers that are generally intended for single-use and sold to a retailer or a dine-in food establishment or a take-out food establishment, regardless of whether the item is used to pre-package food for resale, is filled on-site for food ordered by a customer or is resold as is.Packaging is defined as materials used for the containment or protection of products. It includes paper, plastic, glass or metal, or a mixture. Single-use bags are included but not limited to shopping bags. Nondurable materials used in storage, shipping, or moving, such as packing materials, moving boxes, file boxes, and folders are also included. However, specialty packaging items only used in industrial or manufacturing processes are excluded. Food serviceware includes paper or plastic plates, wraps, cups, bowls, pizza boxes, cutlery, straws, lids, bags, aluminum foil, or clamshells or similar containers that are generally intended for single-use and sold to a retailer or a dine-in food establishment or a take-out food establishment, regardless of whether the item is used to pre-package food for resale, is filled on-site for food ordered by a customer or is resold as is.The proposed Packaging and Printed Paper Fee would apply to all packaging materials, including plastic, metal, glass, and paper fiber.To achieve the USPP's Target 3 to "undertake ambitious actions to effectively recycle or compost 50% of plastic packaging by 2025", the USPP supports EPR policy funded by all packaging types.
Paper ProductsPaper products are defined as products made from paper and other cellulosic fibers, including print and marketing materials.Paper product is defined as non-packaging paper that is printed with text or graphics or intended to be printed with text or graphics as a medium for communicating information. Paper product includes: newsprint and inserts, magazines and catalogs, paper used for copying, writing, or other general use, telephone directories, flyers, brochures, and booklets.Paper is defined as a product made of paper fiber, regardless of its fiber source, including wood, wheat, rice, cotton, bananas, eucalyptus, bamboo, hemp, and sugar cane or bagasse. A paper product is defined as paper sold and supplied including, but not limited to, flyers, brochures, booklets, catalogs, newspapers, magazines, copy paper, printing paper, and other paper materials.Paper is defined as a product made of paper fiber, regardless of its cellulosic fiber source. This includes, but is not limited to wood, wheat, rice, cotton, bananas, eucalyptus, bamboo, hemp, and sugar cane or bagasse. Paper product is defined as paper sold and supplied, including but not limited to flyers, brochures, booklets, catalogs, newspapers, magazines, copy paper, printing paper, and all other paper materials.Paper products are also included. Materials such as newspaper, magazines, flyers, brochures, booklets, catalogs, telephone directories and paper used for copying, writing or other general use are included under covered products.Printing and writing paper are covered, including newspaper, magazines, flyers, brochures, booklets, catalogs, telephone directories and paper used for copying, writing, or other general use.Covered materials and products include all paper sold as a product and printed materials are considered covered products.Paper products are also included as covered materials. Materials such as flyers, cards, newspaper, magazines, copy paper, and general use paper.All paper products are covered unless intended use would render it unsanitary or unsafe, or the product is a bound book.The definition of paper products should include paper sold as a product and all printed materials other than literary, text, and reference bound books. Covered materials should include all paper products regardless of recyclability.Paper products are defined as products made from paper and other cellulosic fibers, including print and marketing materials.Paper products are defined as products made from paper and other cellulosic fibers, including print and marketing materials.Paper products are defined as products made from paper and other cellulosic fibers, including print and marketing materials.Paper products are defined as products made from paper and other cellulosic fibers, containers or packaging used to deliver printed matter to a consumer or recipient, and various printed materials (with the exception of periodicals, magazines, newspapers or literary, text, and reference bound books).Covered materials and products include paper products, paper sold as a product, and printed materials.Paper is defined as a product made of paper fiber, regardless of its fiber source, including wood, wheat, rice, cotton, bananas, eucalyptus, bamboo, hemp, and sugar cane or bagasse. A paper product is defined as paper sold and supplied including, but not limited to, flyers, brochures, booklets, catalogs, newspapers, magazines, copy paper, printing paper, and other paper materials.Printing and writing paper includes newspapers, magazines, flyers, brochures, booklets, catalogs, telephone directories, and paper used for copying, writing, or other general use.Printing and writing paper includes newspapers, magazines, flyers, brochures, booklets, catalogs, telephone directories, and paper used for copying, writing, or other general use.The proposed Packaging and Printed Paper Fee would also apply to printed paper.
Material SpecificThe bill lists categories of plastic polymers that are considered covered materials under the producer responsibility program as determined by the state.Packaging is defined as any plastic material, partial or whole, that is used to contain, protect, deliver, or present goods. This includes primary, secondary, and tertiary packaging.Covered products include food service products, other single-use products (straws, cups, lids, etc.), and certain beverage containers that will not be subject to bottle deposit (pouch, aseptic container, drink box) outlined in this legislation.The bill lists categories of plastic polymers that are considered covered materials under the producer responsibility program as determined by the state.The bill lists categories of plastic polymers that are considered covered materials under the producer responsibility program as determined by the state.Certain plastic products are covered, to include single use items such as straws, utensils, cups, plates, and plastic bags.Single-use plastics are defined as plastic products, determined by the state, that frequent the residential waste stream or have the effect of severely disrupting recycling processes,. This includes single-use plastic items such as straws, utensils, cups, plates, and plastic bags.This bill covers plastic packaging and plastic food serviceware, including items like plates, cups, straws, cutlery, and bowls. Packaging is defined as plastics used for the containment or protection of products.
Beverage ContainersPlastic beverage container is defined as a covered product made of rigid plastic for beverages, including water, beer, wine, spirits, and carbonated drinks.Plastic beverage container means a covered product made of rigid plastic for water and most alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages in a quantity more than or equal to two fluid ounces and less than or equal to one gallon.Beverage containers are included as covered products, though not defined further.Covered products include beverage containers.Plastic beverage container is defined as a covered product made of rigid plastic for beverages, including water, beer, wine, spirits, and carbonated drinks.
ExclusionsPackaging that is used for long-term protection or storage of a product (over 5 years) is excluded from coverage. Several other exclusions are listed: 1. Materials or products that could become unsafe or unsanitary to recycle due to their intended use. 2. Literary, text, and reference bound books. 3. Beverage containers that qualify for deposit/redemption under existing legislation. This bill does not cover beverage containers subject to existing deposit legislation, and glass or rigid metal packaging, including aluminium and steel. Medical products and devices, animal medicine, infant formula, medical food, oral supplements for specific conditions, and packaging for toxic or hazardous products are also excluded.The term packaging does not include containers or materials that are used for the long-term protection or storage of a product with a life of not less than five years. Beverage containers already subject to regulation are also excluded. Printed material does not include a bound book. The term covered material does not mean packaging or paper products that could become unsafe or unsanitary to recycle due to anticipated use, or could disrupt or contaminate the recycling process.Paper products excludes bound books and products that could become unsafe or unsanitary to handle after their intended use. Plastic beverage container excludes rigid plastic containers or bottles that are medical devices, prescription medicine, and packaging used for those products. It also excludes beverage containers for baby formula.Excluded from the definition of covered paper products are bound books and paper products that, by their use, could become unsafe or unsanitary to handle. Excluded from the definition of plastic beverage container are rigid plastic containers or rigid plastic bottles that are medical devices, medical products that are required to be sterile, prescription medicine, and packaging used for those products. Bottles used for infant formula are also excluded.The bill does not cover beverage containers, as defined by the Oregon bottle bill. It also excludes books, napkins, paper towels, or other paper intended to be used for cleaning or absorbing liquids. Exclusions for covered products include: beverage container, as defined in the Oregon bottle bill, bound books, napkins, paper towels or other paper intended to be used for cleaning or the absorption of liquids.Literary, text, or reference bound books are not included as covered products.Excluded from the definition of packaging material are items used in long term storage or protection for a 5 year minimum, beverage containers subject to existing bottle deposit legislation, bound books, and paper that becomes unsafe or unsanitary to recycle.Covered products excludes most beverage containers (those subject to bottle deposit further on in bill). The bill also excludes packaging intended for long-term use.There are a number of exclusions to the definition of packaging material. These include: 1. Beverage containers subject to existing bottle deposit legislation. 2. Reusable food service containers. 3. Packaging that occurs prior to the consumers purchase and does not end up with the consumer. 4. Drug or medical device packaging. 5. Packaging that contains hazardous materials. 6. Packaging or products that become unsafe or unsanitary to recycle due to expected use or contents.There are a number of exclusions to the definition of packaging material. These include: 1. Packaging intended to be used for the long-term storage or protection for a period of at least 5 years. 2. Beverage containers subject to existing bottle deposit legislation. 3. Containers for architectural paint already covered under an effective stewardship program.There are a number of exclusions to the definition of packaging material. These include: 1. Packaging intended to be used for the long-term storage or protection of a durable product for a period of at least 5 years. 2. Beverage containers subject to existing bottle deposit legislation. 3. Containers for architectural paint already covered under an effective stewardship program provided certain performance goals are reached.Covered products should not include materials from the commercial and institutional sectors, though they could be included at a later point.Packaging that is used for long-term protection or storage of a product (over 5 years) is excluded from coverage. Several other exclusions are listed: 1. Materials or products that could become unsafe or unsanitary to recycle due to their intended use. 2. Literary, text, and reference bound books. 3. Beverage containers that qualify for deposit/redemption under existing legislation.Packaging that is used for long-term protection or storage of a product (over 5 years) is excluded from coverage. Several other exclusions are listed: 1. Materials or products that could become unsafe or unsanitary to recycle due to their intended use. 2. Literary, text, and reference bound books. 3. Beverage containers that qualify for deposit/redemption under existing legislation.Packaging that is used for long-term protection or storage of a product (over 5 years) is excluded from coverage. Several other exclusions are listed: 1. Materials or products that could become unsafe or unsanitary to recycle due to their intended use. 2. Literary, text, and reference bound books. 3. Beverage containers that already qualify for deposit/redemption regulations. 4. Paint containers covered by existing EPR law. 5. Medical devices and covered materials and products regulated as a drug, medical device, or dietary supplement. 6. Packaging used to contain toxic or hazardous materials.Packaging that is used for long-term protection or storage of a product (over 5 years) is excluded from coverage. Several other exclusions are listed: 1. Materials or products that could become unsafe or unsanitary to recycle due to their intended use. 2. Periodicals, magazines, newspapers or literary, text, and reference bound books. 3. Beverage containers that already qualify for deposit/redemption regulations. 4. Paint containers covered by existing EPR law. 5. Medical devices and covered materials and products regulated as a drug, medical device, or dietary supplement. 6. Animal biologics, including vaccines, bacterins, antisera, diagnostic kits, and other products of biological origin. 6. Packaging used to contain toxic or hazardous materials.Literary, text, or reference bound books are excluded from the definition of covered products.Paper products excludes bound books and products that could become unsafe or unsanitary to handle after their intended use. Plastic beverage container excludes rigid plastic containers or bottles that are medical devices, prescription medicine, and packaging used for those products. It also excludes beverage containers for baby formula.Exclusions include: 1. Beverage containers covered under existing bottle legislation. 2. Bound books. 3. Napkins, paper towels, or other paper intended to be used for cleaning or the absorption of liquids. Other exclusions include: Rigid pallets, specialty packaging items only used in industrial or manufacturing processes, pallet wrap, refillable propane tanks, packaging related to containers for architectural paint, agricultural items, items used by a nursery, packaging for drugs, and wine and spirit containers subject to existing deposit legislation.Exclusions include: 1. Beverage containers covered under existing bottle legislation. 2. Bound books. 3. Napkins, paper towels, or other paper intended to be used for cleaning or the absorption of liquids. Other exclusions include: Rigid pallets, specialty packaging items only used in industrial or manufacturing processes, pallet wrap, refillable propane tanks, packaging related to containers for architectural paint, agricultural items, items used by a nursery, packaging for medical drugs, infant formula, wine and spirit containers subject to existing deposit legislation, and toxic or hazardous materials labeled to be disposed of in a manner other than recycling.
Covered Entities or End Users
Household/ResidentialThe producer responsibility program must provide curbside recycling that is as convenient as the existing collection plan. The bill includes service to residential units in the definition of curbside recycling.This position states that programs should only cover consumer packaging waste. Covered entities should be limited to the residential sector. The position indicates that industrial, commercial, and institutional locations should be addressed separately, and that public spaces are out of scope.The program includes coverage for any person who presents for collection any amount of covered materials to a stewardship organization implementing an approved producer responsibility plan. The program plan will provide for free collection of recyclable covered material from covered entities through curbside collection services.This program covers collection from residents through curbside service and, where curbside garbage service is not available, through permanent collection facilities.The producer responsibility program must provide for curbside collection to residents. In areas without curbside collection, the program must provide free and equitable access to permanent collection facilities at existing sites and in additional locations as needed to provide convenient access for residents.The PRO program plan must ensure that covered products are collected from residential generators of waste. Covered entities include all residential units.The Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) must, at a minimum, provide for collection of covered product through a curbside or multifamily recycling collection service. The program should continue the same level of service as the existing recycling program, including residential service.The producer responsibility program must provide curbside recycling that is as convenient as the existing collection plan. The bill includes service to residential units in the definition of curbside recycling.The producer responsibility program must provide curbside recycling that is as convenient as the existing collection plan. The bill includes service to residential units in the definition of curbside recycling.The producer responsibility program must provide curbside recycling that is as convenient as the existing collection plan. The bill includes service to residential units in the definition of curbside recycling.The producer responsibility program must provide curbside recycling that is as convenient as the existing collection plan. The bill includes service to residential units in the definition of curbside recycling.This program covers collection from residents through curbside service and, where curbside garbage service is not available, through permanent collection facilities.
Government, Institutional, or AcademicThe bill extends curbside recycling to include schools, state or local agencies, or institutions which were served by municipality or a private sector hauler as of the effective date of the legislation.The PRO program plan must ensure that covered products are collected from governmental generators of waste. Covered entities include schools.The bill extends curbside recycling to include schools, state or local agencies, or institutions which were served by municipality or a private sector hauler as of the effective date of the legislation.The bill extends curbside recycling to include schools, state or local agencies, or institutions which were served by municipality or a private sector hauler as of the effective date of the legislation.The bill extends curbside recycling to include schools, state or local agencies, or institutions which were served by municipality or a private sector hauler as of the effective date of the legislation.The bill extends curbside recycling to include schools, state or local agencies, or institutions which were eligible to be served under a contract with a municipality or a private sector hauler as of the effective date of the legislation.
Business or CommercialThe PRO program plan must ensure that covered products are collected from commercial generators of waste. If the existing recycling service combines residential service with other sectors, and covers more than residential PPP, then the program should account for service to the included sectors.
Industrial
Public SpacesThe program plan will also provide for free collection of recyclable covered material through recycling centers and transfer stations or at public spaces.This program covers collection from residents through public place collection. Public place is defined as streets, sidewalks, plazas, town squares, public parks, beaches, forests, or other public land open for recreation or other uses, and transportation facilities such as bus and train stations, airports, and ferry terminals.The producer responsibility program must provide for public place collection where recycling was already provided, and must develop a plan to expand public place recycling. Public place includes streets, sidewalks, plazas, town squares, public parks, beaches, forests, or other public land open for recreation or other uses, and transportation facilities such as bus and train stations, airports, and ferry terminals.The PRO may also establish a program or service that provides collection from public spaces.The position recommends that expansion of the existing program to include recovery from public spaces should be addressed on a state-by-state basis.This program covers collection from residents through public place collection. Public place is defined as streets, sidewalks, plazas, town squares, public parks, beaches, forests, or other public land open for recreation or other uses, and transportation facilities such as bus and train stations, airports, and ferry terminals.
Producer Definition
BrandsProducer is defined as the manufacturer of a covered material or product under a brand that sells or offers for sale the covered material or product in the state.This bill uses the term responsible party to indicate individuals who must participate. The definition is a tiered list, beginning with a person who manufactures under their own brand a consumer product that uses or is composed of packaging or a paper product, and the product is sold, offered for sale, or distributed in the state.Producer is defined as a tiered list based on priority of responsibility for covered products. The highest priority is the brand owner or brand holder of covered products sold, offered for sale, or distributed in the state.The term producer is defined by a tiered list based on priority of responsibility for covered products. The highest priority is the brand holder of a brand under which the covered product is sold, offered for sale, or distributed in or into the State.A producer is a person who manufactures or sells a covered product, offers for sale, or distributes the product in the state under their own brand. A producer is a person who manufactures a covered product or sells, offers for sale or distributes the covered product in the state under the manufacturer’s own brand. Producer is defined as person that manufactures a covered material or product under own their own brand and sells, offers, or distributes covered materials or products in the state.The term producer is defined by a tiered list based on priority of responsibility for covered products. The highest priority is an entity that manufactures, sells, or distributes covered materials in the state under the brand of the manufacturer.Producer is defined as a tiered list, beginning with a person who manufactures and sells, offers for sale, or distributes covered product in the U.S. under the brand of the manufacturer.This bill uses the term responsible party to indicate individuals who must participate. The definition is a tiered list, beginning with a person who manufactures the covered product using packaging material under the person's own brand and sells, offers for sale, or distributes for sale direct to consumers the covered product and packaging material in or into the state.Producer is defined as the legal owner of a brand for a product sold, offered for sale, or distributed in the state that uses covered packaging material.Producer is defined as the legal owner of a brand for a product sold, offered for sale, or distributed in the state that uses covered packaging material.Responsible party should be defined as a party that has legal ownership of the brand of a product for sale, use, or distribution in the state, including online retailers who sell into the state, that utilizes covered material. The position recommends a tiered criteria for determination of responsible parties, beginning with a person who manufactures a product under the manufacturer’s own brand that uses covered material.Producer is defined as the manufacturer of a covered material or product under a brand that sells or offers for sale the covered material or product in the state.The term producer includes a manufacturer of a covered material or product under a brand that sells or offers for sale the covered material or product in the state.The term producer is defined as a tiered list based on priority of responsibility for covered products. The highest priority is the manufacturer of a covered material or product under a brand that sells or offers for sale the covered material or product in the state.The term producer is defined as a hierarchy based on priority of responsibility for covered products. The highest priority is the person or company who uses the covered material or product under their own name or brand and who sells or offers for sale the product that uses covered material in the state.Manufacturer is defined as a person who manufactures a covered product or sells, offers for sale or distributes the covered product in the state under the manufacturer’s own brand. A brand is the name, symbols, or words that identifies a covered product and attributes it to a manufacturer. Producer is defined as any person that manufactures a covered material or product under the person's own name or brand and sells, offers for sale, or distributes a covered material or product in the State.A producer means the manufacturer of a packaging product who sells, offers for sale, or distributes the product under the person’s own name or brand or any person who sells, offers for sale, or distributes a packaging product in the state.Producer is defined as a tiered list based on priority of responsibility for covered products. The highest priority is the brand owner or brand holder of covered products sold, offered for sale, or distributed in the state.For items sold in packaging at a physical retail location in this state: If the item is sold in packaging under the manufacturer’s own brand then the brand is the producer. If it is sold in packaging that lacks brand identification the producer of the packaging is the person that manufactures the packaged item.For items sold in packaging at a physical retail location in this state: If the item is sold in packaging under the manufacturer’s own brand then the brand is the producer. If it is sold in packaging that lacks brand identification the producer of the packaging is the person that manufactures the packaged item.Responsible entities paying the Packaging and Printed Paper Fee would include brand owners and franchisers.
LicenseesProducer also includes an individual who imports the covered material or product as the owner or licensee of a trademark or brand under which the covered material or product is sold or distributed in the state.If the brand owner is not applicable, the responsible party is the person who owns or licenses the trademark under which the packaging or paper product is used, sold, offered for sale, or distributed in the state.Licensees are included in the definition of producer as brand holders. Brand holder means a person who owns or licenses a brand or who otherwise has rights to market a product under the brand, whether or not the brand trademark is registered.The term brand holder is defined by the bill to mean a person who owns or licenses a brand or who otherwise has rights to market a product under the brand. Licensees are considered producers and responsible for their covered products.A producer can also be the owner or licensee of a trademark that is sold, offered for sale, or distributed in the state. A producer can also be the owner or licensee of a trademark under which a covered product is sold, offered for sale or distributed in this state, whether or not the trademark is registered in the state. Producer also includes a person that imports a covered material or product as an owner or licensee of a trademark or brand, and sells or distributes in the state.If the brand definition does not apply, the producer is the owner or licensee of a trademark of a covered material that is sold or distributed in the state.If the brand does not apply, the producer is the owner or licensee of a trademark under which a covered product is sold, offered for sale, or distributed in the U.S.If the brand owner is not applicable, the responsible party is the person that is the licensee of the trademark under which the covered product using packaging material is used in a commercial enterprise or is sold, offered for sale, or distributed to consumers for sale in or into the state.If the brand owner criteria does not apply, the responsible party should be the owner of license or trademark that sells or distributes covered material.Producer also includes an individual who imports the covered material or product as the owner or licensee of a trademark or brand under which the covered material or product is sold or distributed in the state.The term producer includes an individual who imports the covered material or product as the owner or licensee of a trademark or brand under which the covered material or product is sold or distributed in the state.In the absence of a brand, the producer is the individual who imports the covered material or product as the owner or licensee of a trademark or brand under which the covered material or product is sold or distributed in the state.The second tier is the person or company who imports the product that uses covered material as the owner or licensee of a trademark or brand under which the product is sold or distributed in the stateManufacturer is also defined as the owner or licensee of a trademark under which a covered product is sold, offered for sale or distributed in this state.Producer includes any person that manufactures a covered material or product under the person's own name or brand and sells, offers for sale, distributes, or imports a covered material or product as owner or licensee of a trademark or brand under which a covered material or product is sold or distributed in the state.Producer also includes the owner or licensee of a trademark under which a packaging product is sold, offered for sale, or distributed, whether or not the trademark is registered in the state.Licensees are included in the definition of producer as brand holders. Brand holder means a person who owns or licenses a brand or who otherwise has rights to market a product under the brand, whether or not the brand trademark is registered.If the item is manufactured by a person other than the brand owner, the producer of the packaging is the person that is the licensee of a brand or trademark under which a packaged item is used in a commercial enterprise, sold, offered for sale, or distributed in or into this state, whether or not the trademark is registered in this state.If the item is manufactured by a person other than the brand owner, the producer of the packaging is the person that is the licensee of a brand or trademark under which a packaged item is used in a commercial enterprise, sold, offered for sale, or distributed in or into this state, whether or not the trademark is registered in this state.
Importers/DistributorsThe term producer includes a person or company that offers for sale, sells, or distributes the covered material or product in the state.This legislation applies to producers, retailers, and wholesalers of single-use packaging, but it does not define producers further. Retailers or wholesalers are defined in this legislation. A retailer or wholesaler is a person who sells or offers to consumers single-use packaging, a product that uses single-use packaging, or a single-use product through stores, outlets, e-commerce, telephone, or mail.If the brand owner and licensee are not applicable, the responsible party is a person who imports packaging or paper product into the state for use in a commercial enterprise, sale, offer for sale, or distribution in the state.Licensees are included in the definition of producer as brand holders. Brand holder means a person who owns or licenses a brand or who otherwise has rights to market a product under the brand, whether or not the brand trademark is registered.In the absence of a brand, the producer is the individual who imports the covered product into the State for sale, offer for sale, or distribution in the State, including remote sale or distribution, such as through sales outlets, catalogs, and the Internet, but is not the brand holder. If this does not apply, the producer is the individual who elects to assume the responsibility and register in lieu of a producer.A producer can also be a person who sells, offers for sale, or distributes covered products in the state. A producer is also a person who sells a covered product in or imports a covered product for use in a commercial enterprise that sells, offers for sale, or distributes the covered product in the state.Producer also includes a person that sells, offers for sale, or distributes covered material in the state.If brand and licensee definitions do not apply, the producer is the entity that imports a covered material into the US or the state that is sold or distributed in the state.If brand or licensee does not apply, the producer is the person who imports the covered product into the U.S. to sell, offer for sale, or distribute.If the brand owner and licensee are not applicable, the responsible party is the person that imports the covered product using packaging material into the state for sale, offering for sale, or distribution to consumers for sale in or into the state.Producer also includes a person who imports a product that uses covered packaging material into the state when the brand does not have a physical presence in the United States.Producer also includes a person who is the sole entity that imports a product that uses covered packaging material into the state when the brand does not have a physical presence in the United States.If the brand owner and licensee/trademark criteria do not apply, the responsible party is a person who imports covered material for sale or distribution.The term producer includes a person or company that offers for sale, sells, or distributes the covered material or product in the state.The term producer includes a person or company that offers for sale, sells, or distributes the covered material or product in the state.If the above two definitions do not apply, a producer is the person or company that offers for sale, sells, or distributes the covered material or product in the state.The third tier is the person or company that offers for sale, sells, or distributes the product that uses the covered material or product in the state.Manufacturer included any person that sells a covered product in or imports a covered product for use in a commercial enterprise that sells, offers for sale, or distributes the covered product in the state.Producer also includes anyone who imports a packaging product for use by a commercial enterprise that sells, offers for sale, or distributes packaging products in the state.Licensees are included in the definition of producer as brand holders. Brand holder means a person who owns or licenses a brand or who otherwise has rights to market a product under the brand, whether or not the brand trademark is registered.If there is no brand or licensee, the producer of the packaging is the person that imports the packaged item into the United States for use in a commercial enterprise that sells, offers for sale, or distributes the item in the state.If there is no brand or licensee, the producer of the packaging is the person that imports the packaged item into the United States for use in a commercial enterprise that sells, offers for sale, or distributes the item in the state.Responsible entities paying the Packaging and Printed Paper Fee would also include first importers of brands from outside the U.S.
Producer Exclusions
Small BusinessesProducers are exempt of they generate less than $1 million in annual revenue, less than one ton of covered materials per year in the state, or operate as a single point of retail (not part of a franchise).Exemption criteria for small producers, small retailers, and small wholesalers will be developed. It will include, but not be limited to, size, revenue, number of retail locations, and market share. Producers with less than 1 million dollars in revenue will be exempt.A responsible party is exempt if it produces, sells, offers for sale, or distributes less than one ton of covered material per year in the state, or has a gross annual revenue of less than $1 million.Producers that sell, offer for sale, distribute, or import less than one ton of covered products or generate less than $1 million from covered products in the state are not considered producers.De minimis producers, or small businesses, are excluded. These are defined as producers that annually sell, offer for sale, distribute, or import into the country for sale in the State less than one ton of covered products each year or covered products that in aggregate generate less than $1 million each year in revenue.Producers with an annual revenue of less than $1 million or producers who produce less than one metric ton of covered products are excluded.A producer is excluded if they have a gross revenue of less than $1 million in the state for the organization’s most recent fiscal year or produced or sold less than one metric ton of covered products for use in the most recent calendar year.Producers who generate less than $1 million in gross revenue or sell, offer for sale, or distribute less than 1 ton of covered materials or products into the state in the previous calendar year are excluded. Producers with a single point of sale, and not part of a franchise, are also excluded.Producers with an annual revenue of less than $1 million or producers who produce less than one metric ton of covered products are excluded from the definition of producer. The definition of producer includes a franchisor of a franchise located in the commonwealth but does not include the franchisee operating that franchise.Small businesses are not subject to the requirements of a producer under this bill if they generate less than $1 million in annual revenue or less than 1 ton of covered products.Producers are exempt if gross revenue within the state is less than $2 million in the previous year, or if the producer sold, offered for sale, or distributed products containing less than 1 ton of covered packaging material in the previous year. Producer includes a low-volume producer and a franchisor of a franchise located in the state, but does not include the franchisee operating that franchise.Producers are exempt if gross revenue within the state is less than $2 million in the previous year, or if the producer sold, offered for sale, or distributed products containing less than 1 ton of covered packaging material in the previous year. For the period from one to three years after the effective date of the program contract, producers with less than $5 million in revenue during the previous year are exempt. Producers are also exempt if they sold, offered for sale, or distributed to retailers or direct to consumers products that were perishable food and that were contained, protected, delivered, presented, or distributed in or using less than 15 tons of packaging material in total. Producer includes a low-volume producer and a franchisor of a franchise located in the state, but does not include the franchisee operating that franchise.The position recommends that legislation should set minimum standards for exempting small businesses based on weight or revenue.Producers are exempt of they generate less than $1 million in annual revenue, less than one ton of covered materials per year in the state, or operate as a single point of retail (not part of a franchise).Producers are exempt of they generate less than $1 million in annual revenue, less than one ton of covered materials per year in the state, or operates as a single point of retail (not part of a franchise).Producers are exempt if they generate less than $1 million in annual revenue, less than one ton of covered materials per year in the state, or operates as a single point of retail (not part of a franchise).Producers are exempt if they generate less than $1 million in annual revenue, less than one ton of covered materials per year in the state, or operates as a single point of retail (not part of a franchise).Producers are excluded from complying with this regulation if they generated less than $1 million in gross revenue, or sold, offered for sale, or distributed for sale less than one ton of covered materials in the state during the preceding calendar year.Producers that sell, offer for sale, distribute, or import less than one ton of covered products or generate less than $1 million from covered products in the state are not considered producers.A small business qualifies for exclusion if it has a revenue of less than $1 million for the organization’s most recent fiscal year, or sold less than one metric ton of covered products in or into the state in the most recent calendar year. A small business is also excluded if they are a manufacturer of a beverage sold in a beverage container under the state bottle bill or sold less than five metric tons of covered products, including secondary and tertiary packaging for beverage containers, for use in the state in the most recent calendar year, or lastly, is a business that sells prepared food and is not a producer of food serviceware.A small business qualifies for exclusion if it has a revenue of less than $5 million for the organization’s most recent fiscal year and sold less than one metric ton of covered products in or into the state in the most recent calendar year, or is a restaurant, food cart, or similar business that sells food to be immediately consumed and is not a producer of food serviceware.A minimum-production threshold is recommended to small producers are not subject to the requirements.
GovernmentsMunicipalities or local governments are not included under the definition of producer.Government agencies, municipalities, or other political subdivisions are not considered producers.Government agencies, counties, or other political subdivisions of the state are not considered producers.Governments are excluded from the definition of producer.A producer is excluded if they are a public body as defined in state legislation.Local government is excluded from the definition of producer.Municipalities or local governments are not included under the definition of producer.Municipalities or local governments are not included under the definition of producer.Municipalities or local governments are not included under the definition of producer.Municipalities or local governments are not included under the definition of producer.The definition of producer does not include a local government.Producer does not include municipalities or local governments.Government agencies, municipalities, or other political subdivisions are not considered producers.Public bodies are excluded.Public bodies are excluded.
CharitiesRegistered 501(c)(3) charitable organizations and 501(c)4) social welfare organizations are not included as producers.Registered 501(c)(3) charitable organizations and 501(c)(4) social welfare organizations are not considered producers.Nonprofit organizations are excluded from the definition of producer.A producer is excluded if they are a nonprofit organization.Nonprofits are exempt from the definition of producer.501(c)(3) registered nonprofit organizations are excluded from the definition of producer.501(c)(3) registered nonprofit organizations are excluded from the definition of producer.Registered 501(c)(3) charitable organizations and 501(c)(4) social welfare organizations are excluded.Registered 501(c)(3) charitable organizations and 501(c)(4) social welfare organizations are excluded.Registered 501(c)(3) charitable organizations and 501(c)(4) social welfare organizations are excluded.Registered 501(c)(3) charitable organizations and 501(c)4) social welfare organizations are not included as producers.Nonprofit organizations are excluded. Nonprofit organizations are excluded.A nonprofit exemption is recommended to ensure that nonprofits are not subject to the requirements.
RetailersRetailers that are not producers are excluded from program requirements.Producer exceptions include online markets that connect buyers and sellers, persons who do not own inventory, do not control the distribution of the single-use product, or does not determine the price of a product from an online market.Retailers that are not producers are excluded from program requirements.Retailers that are not producers are excluded from program requirements.Retailers that are not producers are excluded from program requirements.Retailers that are not producers are excluded from program requirements.Retailers that operate a single retail sales establishment, have no online sales, and are not supplied or operated as part of a franchise or a chain are excluded.Retailers that operate a single retail sales establishment, have no online sales, and are not supplied or operated as part of a franchise or a chain are excluded.
Producer Responsibility Organization
Individual Producer ResponsibilityProducers must comply either as an individual or as part of a stewardship organization.
Collective Producer ResponsibilityProducers may form a Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) and discharge responsibilities to that organization.Producers are required to either individually or collectively form or join a stewardship organization.CGF states that the program should be managed by a professional Producer Responsibility Organisation (PRO) that covers an entire jurisdiction.All responsible parties shall must participate in a stewardship organization implementing an approved program plan. If multiple stewardship organizations register, the stewardship organizations shall coordinate and submit one program plan. The multiple stewardship organizations may form a third-party entity to implement the requirements for all member stewardship organizations.Producers must register individually or form one or more PRO. Producers and PRO(s) must register with and submit a program plan to the state.A producer or group of producers can designate a Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) to develop and carry out the activities required by this legislation.All producers that fall under the producer definition must register with and be a member of a Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO). The bill requires producers to form or join extended producer responsibility organizations for packaging, food serviceware, and printing and writing paper.Producers must comply either as an individual or as part of a stewardship organization.All producers that fall under the producer definition must register with and be a member of a Producer Responsibility Organization.PROs are established by category of covered products or beverage containers. A producer can join multiple PROs if they cover different products. The categories of covered products will be established by the administrator, working with the PROs.Responsible parties must submit a plan to the state to establish a packaging stewardship organization, either individually or collectively.The state will select a packaging stewardship organization via a competitive bid process. The state will enter into a contract with a packaging stewardship organization to operate the packaging stewardship program.The state will select a packaging stewardship organization via a competitive bid process. The state will enter into a contract with a packaging stewardship organization to coordinate the packaging stewardship program. However, producers are individually responsible for compliance with the regulation.Producers may form a Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) and discharge responsibilities to that organization.Producers may form a Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO), and that organization will assume program responsibilities defined in this bill.Producers may form a Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO), and that organization will assume program responsibilities defined in this bill.Producers may form a Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO), and that organization will assume program responsibilities defined in this bill.Manufacturers must join a stewardship organization to implement a plastics stewardship program outlined in the bill. A group of producers may form a stewardship organization to implement the program defined in this legislation.Producers must either individually or collectively join a PRO.Producers must register individually or form one or more PRO. Producers and PRO(s) must register with and submit a program plan to the state.Each producer must register with and be a member of a PRO that administers a producer responsibility program. Each producer must register with and be a member of a PRO that administers a producer responsibility program. The position recommends the establishment of a Packaging and Printed Paper Stewardship Organization (PSO). It recommends a single PSO nationwide, or across multiple states and regions if enacted at the state level. The PSO would set and collect fees based on the established needs, and disburse funds in order to meet goals.
Individual Producer Responsibility OptionProducers may comply individually.Producers are required to either individually or collectively form or join a stewardship organization.A single producer may develop and implement a plan to carry out the required activities for its own covered products.Producer Responsibility Organization can refer to a single producer that develops and implements a plan to carry out the activities for its own covered products.Responsible parties may comply with the regulation individually.Producers may comply individually.Producers may comply individually.Producers may comply individually.Producers may comply individually.Producers may comly individually or as part of a stewardship organization.Producers must either individually or collectively join a PRO.A single producer may develop and implement a plan to carry out the required activities for its own covered products.
Nonprofit RequirementPRO(s) must be nonprofit organizations.A stewardship organization formed shall be an organization that is exempt from taxation under Section 501(c)(3) of the federal Internal Revenue Code.The PRO should operate on a nonprofit basis.A PRO is defined as a nonprofit organization that qualifies for a tax exemption under 26 U.S.C. Sec. 501(c)(3) of the federal internal revenue code and is designated by a producer or group of producers to develop and carry out the required program activities.The PRO must be a nonprofit organization that qualifies for 501(c)(3) designation.PROs are required to be a nonprofit organization. The Stewardship Organization (SO) must be a nonprofit organization created by group of producers.PROs are required to be a nonprofit organization.Any PRO must be established as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.NWRA's preferred EPR model is based on a non-profit Stewardship Responsibility Organization that includes state government, local government, recycling collectors, recycling processors, and producers. The SRO distributes funding for recycling to the municipalities. PRO(s) must be nonprofit organizations.PRO(s) must be nonprofit organizations.PRO(s) must be nonprofit organizations.PRO(s) must be nonprofit organizations.A stewardship organization must be a nonprofit organization.A PRO is defined as a nonprofit organization that qualifies for a tax exemption under 26 U.S.C. Sec. 501(c)(3) of the federal internal revenue code and is designated by a producer or group of producers to develop and carry out the required program activities.The PSO should be a third-party non governmental organization.
Targets
Rate TargetsThe producer responsibility plan must include a proposed minimum recycling rate for covered materials.The bill requires achieving a 75% recycling rate of single-use packaging and single-use products by 2032 and annually thereafter.The position states that the overall target should be measurable, achievable, and cost effective while seeking strong environmental performance. Reasonable benchmarks are indicated, including a 50-60% collection target with the potential to 60-80% over time, depending on cost-effectiveness.EMF supports clearly defining the target outcomes to be met over time. The paper provides the example of identifying what time-bound recycling targets by packaging type should be met and how exactly they should be measured.The program plan will include proposed performance standards or goals for covered materials. These standards must be designed to meet the state goals for reuse of covered material, post-consumer recycled content in covered material, and recyclability of covered material. The performance standards will be based on weight, material type, or other factors approved by the state.At a minimum, each plan must achieve the following targets: 1. By 2026, 55% of all covered products supplied into the state are reused or recycled, with a minimum of 5% reused 2. By 2030, 75% of all covered products supplied into the state are reused or recycled, with a minimum of 10% reusedThe bill specifies minimum performance requirements: 1. By 2026, a minimum of 55% of all covered products supplied into the State are reused or recycled, with a minimum of 5% reused. 2. By 2030, a minimum of 75% of all covered products supplied into the state are reused or recycled, with a minimum of 10% reused.The PRO must meet the statewide annual plastic packaging recovery goal set by the department. The PRO must meet the established statewide contamination reduction goals set by the department. An extended producer responsibility program must meet the reuse and recycling performance requirements. All covered products sold or delivered in the state must be 55% reused or recycled by 2026 and five percent must be reused. By 2030, 75% must be reused or recycled, 10% of which must be reused.Minimum recycling rates for covered materials must be set in the stewardship plan.The stewardship organization must include in their program plan how they intend to achieve and assist collectors and facilities in achieving a combined reduction and recycling rate of no less than 65% by weight by July 1, 2027, no less than 80% by weight by July 1, 2031, and no less than 100% by weight by July 1, 2035 of covered materials managed by the organization.The minimum rate targets include: 1. By December 31, 2027, at leased 65% of all covered products, except paper, recycled. 2. By December 31, 2032, at least 80% of all covered products, except paper, recycled.The proposed goals must include goals for the achievement of a statewide recycling rate, recycling access rate, composting rate, contamination rate, waste reduction rate, and alternative material recovery rate.The program goals must include recycling access and collection rate goals for municipalities, overall program and material-specific recycling rate goals, packaging material litter reduction goals,and any other goals required by the state.The program goals must include recycling access and collection rate goals for municipalities, overall program and material-specific recycling rate goals, and packaging material litter reduction goals.The agreement supports reuse, recovery, and recycling targets, and includes consideration for other targets, such as waste reduction, GHG emissions reduction, and toxicity in packaging materials. Reuse, recycling, and recovery targets should be calculated relative to the amount of material producers place on the market.The producer responsibility plan must include a proposed minimum recycling rate for covered materials.The producer responsibility plan must include a proposed minimum recycling rate for covered materials.The producer responsibility plan must include a proposed minimum recycling rate and minimum recovery rate for covered materials.The producer responsibility plan must include a proposed minimum recycling rate and minimum recovery rate for covered materials.The bill requires the stewardship organization to include performance goals for covered materials, including a statewide recovery rate, in the program plan.The PRO must identify performance goals for a minimum post-consumer recycled material content rate and a minimum recycling rate for packaging products, and describe how such goals will be met or exceeded over time.At a minimum, each plan must achieve the following targets: 1. By 2026, 55% of all covered products supplied into the state are reused or recycled, with a minimum of 5% reused 2. By 2030, 75% of all covered products supplied into the state are reused or recycled, with a minimum of 10% reused
Recycled Content TargetsThe producer responsibility plan must include a proposed minimum PCR content rate requirement.The bill would, beginning January 1, 2035, require all single-use packaging and single-use products sold, offered for sale, distributed, or imported in or into the state to include 75% post-consumer recycled content.The following minimum recycled content requirements for plastic beverage bottles must be met by producers: 1. Jan 2025-Dec 2029: No less than 25% by weight 2. After Jan 2030: No less than 50% by weight For each listed material category, the following minimum recycled content requirements must be met: | Material Category | By 2026 | By 2030 | | ---------- | ---------- | ---------- | | Other Rigid plastic | 30 percent | 50 percent | | Flexible plastic | 10 percent | 30 percent | | Paper Packaging | 50 percent | 75 percent | | Other Paper Prod. | 25 percent | 50 percent | | Aluminum | 50 percent | 70 percent | | Steel | 30 percent | 50 percent | | Glass | 40 percent | 60 percent |The bill specifies recycled content targets for plastic beverage containers connected to dates: 1. From January 1, 2025, through December 31, 2029: No less than 25% post-consumer recycled plastic by weight. 2. On and after January 1, 2030: No less than 50% post-consumer recycled plastic by weight. The annual minimum post-consumer recycled content for all other covered products will be determined by the state. This will apply to other rigid plastic, flexible plastic, paper packaging, other paper products, aluminum, steel, and glass.Covered products sold or distributed in the state must meet the following annual minimum post-consumer recycled content requirements, by material category, for the total quantity of covered products sold or distributed in this state: | Material Category | By 2026 | By 2030 | | ---------- | ---------- | ---------- | | Rigid plastic | 30 percent | 50 percent | | Flexible plastic | 10 percent | 30 percent | | Paper packaging | 50 percent | 75 percent | | Other paper products | 25 percent | 50 percent | | Aluminum | 50 percent | 70 percent | | Steel | 30 percent | 50 percent | | Glass | 40 percent | 60 percent |All single-use packaging and products must be at least 75% PCR content by 1 Oct 2027.The stewardship organization must include in their program plan how they intend to meet the proposed minimum post-consumer recycled material content rates.The proposed goals must include goals for recycled material content use standards.The program must include goals supporting an increased reuse by producers of packaging material and an increased amount of post-consumer recycled content in packaging material used by producers.The program must include goals supporting an increased reuse by producers of packaging material and an increased amount of post-consumer recycled content in packaging material used by producers.The producer responsibility plan must include a proposed minimum PCR content rate requirement.The producer responsibility plan must include a proposed minimum PCR content rate requirement.The producer responsibility plan must include a proposed minimum PCR content rate requirement.Within five years after a plan is approved, producers will be required to meet the minimum recovery, recycling, and post-consumer recycled material content rate for a covered material or product as approved by the state in the producer responsibility plan.The bill requires all single-use packaging and products to be at least seventy-five per cent post-consumer content by June 1, 2025.All single-use packaging products must be composed of at least 75% post-consumer content by January 1, 2027.The following minimum recycled content requirements for plastic beverage bottles must be met by producers: 1. Jan 2025-Dec 2029: No less than 25% by weight 2. After Jan 2030: No less than 50% by weight For each listed material category, the following minimum recycled content requirements must be met: | Material Category | By 2026 | By 2030 | | ---------- | ---------- | ---------- | | Other Rigid plastic | 30 percent | 50 percent | | Flexible plastic | 10 percent | 30 percent | | Paper Packaging | 50 percent | 75 percent | | Other Paper Prod. | 25 percent | 50 percent | | Aluminum | 50 percent | 70 percent | | Steel | 30 percent | 50 percent | | Glass | 40 percent | 60 percent |
Material Specific TargetsThe plan must include specific content and recycling rates for covered materials, including paper products, glass, metal, and plastics. The bill would, beginning January 1, 2023, require all single-use packaging and single-use products sold, offered for sale, distributed, or imported in or into the state to be easily recyclable or easily compostable in the state.The position indicates that material-specific targets may be appropriate but should take into account local waste streams and viable end markets.The program plan will include proposed performance standards or goals for covered materials. These standards must be designed to meet the state goals for reuse of covered material, post-consumer recycled content in covered material, and recyclability of covered material. The performance standards will be based on weight, material type, or other factors approved by the state.For each listed material category, PRO(s) must achieve the following combined recycling and reuse rates: | Material category | By 2026 | By 2030 | | ---------- | ---------- | ---------- | | Rigid plastic, incl. beverage containers | 25 percent | 60 percent | | Flexible plastic | 10 percent | 25 percent | | Paper | 60 percent | 85 percent | | Aluminum | 55 percent | 75 percent | | Steel | 45 percent | 75 percent | | Glass | 70 percent | 85 percent |The legislation requires PROs to achieve a combined reuse and recycling rates for rigid plastic, including plastic beverage containers, flexible plastic, paper, aluminum, steel, and glass.The PRO must meet the following material reuse and recycling performance requirements (percentages indicate amount that must be reused or recycled): | Material Category | By 2026 | By 2030 | | ---------- | ---------- | ---------- | | Rigid plastic | 25 percent | 60 percent | | Flexible plastic | 10 percent | 25 percent | | Paper | 60 percent | 85 percent | | Aluminum | 55 percent | 75 percent | | Steel | 45 percent | 75 percent | | Glass | 70 percent | 85 percent |All single-use packaging and products must be readily recyclable or compostable by 2030. All single-use plastic packaging and foodware must be reduced to max extent possible, no less than 25% by 1 Oct 2030.Minimum material-specific targets include: 1. By December 31, 2027, 75% of all beverage containers and paper covered products recycled and 50% of all industrially compostable covered products composted. 2. By December 31, 2032, 90% of all beverage containers and paper covered products recycled and 70% of all industrially compostable covered products composted.The stewardship plan must propose performance goals for each type of packaging material managed under the program.Material specific recycling rate goals will be set within the program.Material specific recycling rate goals will be set within the program.The plan must include specific content and recycling rates for covered materials, including paper products, glass, metal, and plastics. The plan must include specific content and recycling rates for covered materials, including paper products, glass, metal, and plastics. The plan must include specific content and recycling rates for covered materials, including paper products, glass, metal, and plastics. The plan must include specific content and recycling rates for covered materials, including paper products, glass, metal, and plastics. The bill sets the following minimum targets for plastic: 1. All single-use packaging and products must be readily recyclable or compostable by June 1, 2028. 2. All single-use plastic packaging and single-use plastic service ware must be reduced, to the maximum extent practicable, and by not less than twenty-five per cent by June 1, 2030.All single-use packaging products must be readily recyclable or compostable by January 1, 2030. Single-use plastic packaging must be reduced to the maximum extent practicable, or by at least 25%, by January 1, 2030.For each listed material category, PRO(s) must achieve the following combined recycling and reuse rates: | Material category | By 2026 | By 2030 | | ---------- | ---------- | ---------- | | Rigid plastic, incl. beverage containers | 25 percent | 60 percent | | Flexible plastic | 10 percent | 25 percent | | Paper | 60 percent | 85 percent | | Aluminum | 55 percent | 75 percent | | Steel | 45 percent | 75 percent | | Glass | 70 percent | 85 percent |The bill sets the following statewide recycling rate goals for plastic: 1. At least 25% by 2028 and until 2039. 2. At least 50% by 2040 and until 2049. 3. At least 70% by 2050 and each subsequent year, unless modified by the State.The bill sets the following statewide recycling rate goals for plastic packaging and food serviceware: 1. At least 25% by 2028 and in each subsequent year. 2. At least 50% by 2040 and in each subsequent year. 3. At least 70% by 2050 and each subsequent year.
Targets Set in LegislationAt a minimum, each plan must achieve the performance requirements defined in bill.The bill requires all covered products to be reusable, recyclable, or compostable by January 1, 2030. Minimum recycling rate targets are specified in the legislation.Most targets are to be set in the stewardship plan, but the targets must meet the minimums specified in the bill. The bill sets minimums for post-consumer content in single-use packaging and products, recyclability, compostability, and reduction.Minimum targets are set in the legislation, and each plan submitted by a PRO must contain achievable performance targets for the collection and recycling of the applicable covered product or beverage container.The regulation governing the EPR program must include ambitious, achievable goals. The legislation may set baseline or minimum targets, and the PRO should propose update targets in the stewardship plan.Minimum targets are set in legislation. The stewardship plan must include performance goals.Minimum performance goals are established in this bill.At a minimum, each plan must achieve the performance requirements defined in bill.
Adjustable Targets The position recommends revision of targets at appropriate intervals. Revisions should take into account previous achievement levels and technological and organizational advancement.Starting in 2028 and at least every five years, the state can establish or adjust performance requirements, add material categories, and make program adjustments.Minimum post-consumer recycled content requirements and reuse and recycling performance requirements are adjustable by the state. When making adjustments, the state will consider factors such as market conditions, material availability, sorting and processing capacity, and the carbon footprint, and other environmental and social impacts, of the production, transportation, and processing of the recycled material.The PRO should propose updated targets over time.The producer responsibility plan must include a plan to adjust the minimum post-consumer content rate and recovery and recycling rate targets on an annual basis.The producer responsibility plan must include a plan to adjust the minimum post-consumer content rate and recovery and recycling rate targets on an annual basis.The producer responsibility plan must include a plan to adjust the minimum post-consumer content rate and recovery and recycling rate targets on an annual basis, taking into account changes in market conditions, recycling rates, availability of recycled materials, infrastructure capacity, and utilization rates.The producer responsibility plan must include a plan to adjust the minimum post-consumer content rate and recovery and recycling rate targets on an annual basis, taking into account changes in market conditions, recycling rates, availability of recycled materials, infrastructure capacity, and utilization rates.Starting in 2028 and at least every five years, the state can establish or adjust performance requirements, add material categories, and make program adjustments.On or after January 1, 2038, the statewide plastic recycling goal may be adjusted after consideration of environmental, technical and economic conditions. An adjustment may not change the goal to less than 35% or more than 70%.On or after January 1, 2038, the statewide plastic recycling goal may be adjusted after consideration of environmental, technical, and economic conditions. An adjustment may not change the goal to less than 35% or more than 70%.
Structure/Type
Municipal Reimbursement (Financial Only)The producers or PRO are responsible for all financial costs of the program. The PRO must reimburse the costs incurred by the county, city, or town for collection of covered products.The producers or Stewardship Organization (SO) are responsible for all financial costs of the program. The producers or SO must reimburse local governments for operational costs including collecting, transporting, and processing covered materials.While ISRI is not opposed to supporting policies that aid underdeveloped markets or hard to recycle products, they specify these policies should be temporary in nature and should directly compensate municipalities and recyclers for the costs associated with separate collection, transportation, and processing. The stewardship organization(s) are responsible for all financial costs of the program. The stewardship organization(s) will distribute funds to municipalities, or the private entities that municipalities contract with, to support operational recycling costs. The program structure also provides for financing via grant funding.The stewardship organization is responsible for all financial costs of the program. The stewardship organization must reimburse local governments for operational costs of managing packaging material including collection and transportation.The stewardship organization must reimburse local governments for operational costs of managing packaging material including collection, transportation, and processing.NWRA believes municipalities should maintain the operational function of their recycling systems, but producers should bear the costs of the EPR system.The position indicates that if a municipal reimbursement model is used, municipalities should have the option to not participate and continue with current system. If municipalities do choose to participate in the stewardship program, they should have the option to use existing contracts and receive stipends. Any calculations for reimbursement payments must incentivize operational and cost efficiency.The producers or stewardship organizations are responsible for all financial costs of the program. The producers must reimburse local governments for operational costs including collecting, transporting, and processing covered materials.The producers or PRO are responsible for all financial costs of the program. The PRO must reimburse the costs incurred by the county, city, or town for collection of covered products.
Financial and Partial OperationalThe producers or PRO are responsible for all financial costs of the program. The PRO will reimburse municipalities, either directly or through providers.The PRO must provide for the collection of covered products identified by the state including the collection, processing, transportation, and disposal of materials. The PRO must reimburse the reasonable expenses of a local government or the local government’s agent for any of the following: anti-contamination educational programming, cost of transferring covered products, cost of providing recycling collection services for covered products at multifamily properties that currently lack such services transfer costs, recycling collection services, expansion of collection costs, and costs associated with recycling system improvements.The producers or PRO are responsible for all financial costs of the program. The PRO will reimburse local governments for the collection for recycling or disposal of covered products. The PRO is responsible for providing for the collection for recycling and management of materials identified on the statewide recycling list.The producers or PRO are responsible for all financial costs of the program. The PRO will reimburse municipalities that choose to continue providing service, either directly or through providers. If a municipality does not choose to provide service, the PRO is responsible for contracting private service providers to fulfill program requirements.The producers or PRO are responsible for all financial costs of the program. The PRO will reimburse municipalities, either directly or through providers.The producers or PRO are responsible for all financial costs of the program. The PRO will reimburse municipalities, either directly or through providers.The producers or PRO are responsible for all financial costs of the program. The PRO will reimburse municipalities that choose to continue providing service, either directly or through providers. If a municipality does not choose to provide service, the PRO is responsible for contracting private service providers to fulfill program requirements.The producers or PRO are responsible for all financial costs of the program. The PRO will reimburse municipalities that choose to continue providing service, either directly or through providers. If a municipality does not choose to provide service, the PRO is responsible for contracting private service providers to fulfill program requirements.The producers or PRO are responsible for all financial costs of the program. The PRO will work with the state to develop a method of payment to municipalities, recycling and other solid waste collection and disposal facilities, and other appropriate entities that provide services pursuant to this plan. The PRO will use existing infrastructure, but may establish a separate infrastructure system if necessary.A PRO must provide for the collection and responsible recycling of covered products identified by the state. A PRO shall, upon request, fund in advance or reimburse, the eligible expenses of a local government or the local government’s service provider for eligible costs as provided in this section.A PRO must provide for the collection and responsible recycling of a specified list of covered products identified by the state that are not collected in municipal programs. These “producer-collected materials” are a subset of the total materials collected for recycling. A PRO shall, upon request, fund in advance or reimburse, the eligible expenses of a local government or the local government’s service provider for eligible costs as provided in this section.
Financial with Municipal Contracts
Financial and Full OperationalThe producers or PRO are responsible for all financial costs of the program. The PRO is responsible for expanding and improving infrastructure and collection programs. The bill does not specify responsibility over existing collection programs.The responsible parties are responsible for all financial costs of the program. The stewardship organization must provide payment to service providers. The bill does not specify whether that is municipal or private service providers, or whether the payment is through contracts or reimbursement.Producers are responsible for full financial funding of all program activities. They are also responsible for operations, but may contract counties to continue to provide service in their jurisdictions. The producers are responsible for all financial costs of the program. The PRO must provide for the collection of covered products. A PRO may do so by entering into an agreement with a governmental or private entity to compensate the entity for the collection of covered products. The PRO must provide reimbursement of 100% of the cost to the entity of managing the covered products, including, administrative costs, sorting, and reprocessing.
Financial and Undetermined OperationalEMF does not suggest a specific structure, but states that it is important to clearly define who bears what part of the financial and operational responsibilities to fulfill the objectives and targets.The agreement states that producers will fund the PRO through fees, and outlines what those fees will cover. The position presents municipal reimbursement as an option, but does not recommend a specific level of operational control for the PRO.The producers or PRO are responsible for all financial costs of the program. The bill does not define whether the PRO will provide for collection and processing through reimbursement or contracts. This will be determined in the program plan.
Cost Coverage
Operational CostsThe program must cover collection and processing of recyclables.The stewardship organization must pay for the source reduction, collection, and recycling of the single-use packaging and single-use products that the producers covered under the stewardship plan sell, offer for sale, distribute, or import in or into the state.The policy position indicates possible ways that recycling system goals could be enabled through policy, including daily operations.This paper recommends that funding from EPR programs be dedicated to specific activities and objectives, which as a minimum should include contributing to covering the net cost of collection, sorting, and recycling and, where recycling is not possible, disposal/safe treatment of packaging. EMF emphasizes that it is important to clearly define the objectives and scope of responsibilities/activities of the EPR scheme, to ensure that it is clear to all stakeholders what activities funding should be raised and used for and what outcomes should be delivered.The program plan must provide funding for collection and processing of covered materials for recycling. The program will cover the cost of collection, transportation, processing, and marketing of recyclable covered material. Costs also include administration, facility and equipment, maintenance, fuel, and labor.The program funding covers costs associated with collecting, transporting, and processing covered products.The cost coverage must include the collection, processing, transportation, and disposal of materials.The cost coverage must include the collection, processing, and marketing of recycling and management of materials on the statewide recycling list. The program must provide reimbursements to local governments for operational costs including collecting, transporting, and processing covered materials.The cost coverage must include funds to reimburse participating collectors and to fund operating costs, like collection, processing, transportation and recycling or disposal of covered materials. Fees will cover the costs of management of covered products, including costs associated with collecting, transporting, processing, recycling, and composting covered products after consumer use. Program funding will be provided to municipalities, or the private entities that municipalities contract with, to support operational recycling costs.Program funds will be used to reimburse municipalities for operational costs associated with managing packaging material including collection, transportation, and processing.Program funds will be used to reimburse municipalities for operational costs associated with managing packaging material including collection, transportation, and processing.Fees should cover all recycling program costs (collection, transportation, processing, reuse, recycling, other recovery). Program costs should also cover the disposal of contaminated recyclables at MRFs and non-recyclable contamination.The program must cover collection and processing of covered materials and products.The program must cover collection and processing of covered materials and products.The program must cover collection and processing of covered materials and products.The program must cover collection and processing of covered materials and products.Costs must cover collection and disposal of covered materials.The program must reimburse local governments for costs associated with collecting, transporting, and processing covered materials and products that are listed in the stewardship plan.The program plan cost coverage must include the costs associated with the collection, transportation, reuse, and recycling or disposal of discarded packaging products.The program funding covers costs associated with collecting, transporting, and processing covered products.The cost coverage must support the collection and recycling of covered products that are included on the uniform statewide collection list or as necessary to meet the statewide plastic recycling goal.The cost coverage must support the PRO’s obligations as defined in the law, including but not limited to: collection of specified “producer-collected materials,” transportation of collected materials from locations distant from processing facilities, expansion of municipal collection programs as identified by a needs assessment, contamination removal, and commodity risk fee (paid to recycling processing facilities), and as necessary to meet the statewide plastic packaging recycling goal.To achieve the USPP's Target 3 to "undertake ambitious actions to effectively recycle or compost 50% of plastic packaging by 2025", the USPP will support EPR for all packaging as an opportunity to financially sustain collection and sortation programs for all recyclable packaging.
Education and OutreachThe individual producer, or PRO, is required to provide effective outreach, education, and communications to consumers in the state. The stewardship organization plan must include funding to support education and outreach.The policy position indicates possible ways that recycling system goals could be enabled through policy, including consumer education, contamination reduction, and labeling.The policy position states that all generated funds from financing mechanism must be dedicated exclusively to improving the recycling system, enhancing recycling infrastructure, and educating consumers.Covered costs should include investments in consumer education and awareness, though consumer education should not be limited to EPR financing but also complemented by public agency programs.The program plan will provide a percentage of program funding towards education. PRO(s) must develop a plan for education and outreach and reimburse municipalities for education and outreach activities that support the achievement of the reuse and recycling performance requirements.The program will include an education and outreach component. Counties will be reimbursed for the costs of providing education and outreach, subject to mutual agreement between the jurisdiction and the PRO and using an approach specified in the plan.The cost coverage must include the development of educational resources.The program must address education and outreach.The cost coverage must include funds to make investments in education, public outreach, and communication.Administrative costs covered by program fees also include the cost of outreach and education. The program is structured to provide fund distribution through grants. The stewardship organization will consider grant proposals designed to increase consumer education in the state regarding accessing recycling infrastructure and reducing contamination in recycling.A portion of program funding will be used for efforts designed to improve recycling education in the state.A portion of program funding will be used for efforts designed to improve recycling education in the state.NWRA would support legislation that requires the SRO to improve recycling through many approaches, including coordinating education.Funding should cover recycling program education.The individual producer, or PRO, is required to provide effective outreach, education, and communications to consumers in the state.The individual producer, or PRO, is required to provide effective outreach, education, and communications to consumers in the state.The individual producer, or PRO, is required to provide effective outreach, education, and communications to consumers in the state.The individual producer, or PRO, is required to provide effective outreach, education, and communications to consumers in the state.Costs must cover outreach for collection opportunities and retailer notification about the program and their collection opportunities. The stewardship program must provide for outreach and education that are designed to achieve covered materials and products management goals and requirements, including the prevention of contamination of covered materials and product.The program plan must include public outreach, education, and communication with respect to the stewardship plan. PRO(s) must develop a plan for education and outreach and reimburse municipalities for education and outreach activities that support the achievement of the reuse and recycling performance requirements.A PRO, in consultation with the Oregon Recycling System Advisory Council, shall develop educational resources and promotional campaigns to promote the uniform statewide collection list.A PRO, in consultation with the Oregon Recycling System Advisory Council, shall develop educational resources and promotional campaigns to promote the uniform statewide collection list.Funding from the proposed fees would go towards consumer education and outreach programs. The position recommends that funds be disbursed through direct investments, contracting services, cost-sharing agreements, and competitive grants.
AdministrationThe program must cover administrative costs associated with registering, operating, and updating the program.The bill requires a stewardship organization to pay to the department an administrative fee to cover the department’s full costs of administering and enforcing the act, not to exceed the department’s actual and reasonable regulatory costs.Covered costs should include the costs of running the PRO, including oversight and enforcement.The program plan will provide a percentage of program funding towards implementation and administration of the program plan.Costs to the state related to implementing, administering, and enforcing the program are paid by the PRO(s).Program funding will cover the state's full costs to implement, administer, and enforce this legislation.The PRO must pay the department for administering, implementing, and the enforcement of their existence.Cost coverage must be addressed in stewardship plan, and must address costs of PRO administration and government administration, review, and oversight.The program must cover costs associated with producer or SO administration and government administration, review, oversight, and enforcement.Program fees will cover the costs of management of covered products, including administrative costs of the PRO and the government. This includes costs associated with oversight, planning, plan review, compliance, enforcement, and staffing.The program may provide funding to cover the stewardship organization's reasonable operating expenses and administrative costs. The stewardship organization will pay to the state a reasonable annual fee, not to exceed $300,000, to cover the costs to the state associated with plan review, oversight, administration, and enforcement of the program.Funding will cover administration of the stewardship organization as well as government costs associated with administering and enforcing the stewardship program.Funding will cover administration of the stewardship organization as well as government costs associated with administering and enforcing the stewardship program.NWRA would support legislation that requires the SRO to improve recycling through many approaches, including harmonizing lists and coordinating enforcement.Covered costs should include program administration and government oversight and administration. Fees must be reasonable and sufficient to cover state agency oversight costs (writing, planning, review, oversight, compliance, enforcement, directly related tasks).The program must cover administrative costs associated with registering, operating, and updating the program.The program must cover administrative costs associated with registering, operating, and updating the program.The program must cover administrative costs associated with registering, operating, and updating the program.The program must cover administrative costs associated with registering, operating, and updating the program.Costs must cover fees to the state for reviewing the plastics stewardship program plan and an annual fee for program management. Program fees must cover costs associated with implementing the stewardship plan, including the administrative costs of a producer or stewardship organization. Program fees must also cover costs associated with the administration, review, oversight, and enforcement of the stewardship plan by the state and the costs of third-party evaluation.Producers are expected to cover costs incurred by the department in association with the review, implementation, and enforcement of the producers’ packaging product stewardship plans.Costs to the state related to implementing, administering, and enforcing the program are paid by the PRO(s).
Litter PreventionThe stewardship organization plan must include funding for litter prevention and cleanup measures.The program plan must describe how it will minimize litter and fund the cleanup of litter from covered materials.The PRO must coordinate with the state on litter prevention.PROs are required to coordinate with the department on litter prevention measures. Funds collected by the state will be deposited in the waste and litter management special fund, and used for implementing, administering, and enforcing waste and litter management programs pursuant to this legislation.The cost coverage must include litter prevention and cleanup activities or provide grants for other entities to carryout litter prevention or control.The cost coverage must include the abatement and removal of litter in public spaces like the ocean and parks.Fees will cover the cost of cleanup of covered products that become litter, including from public places, and freshwater and marine environments, and the cost of other appropriate mitigation measures. The stewardship program will provide funding to, and coordinate with, entities that collect covered product or beverage container litter from public places or freshwater or marine environments in the United States, including Tribal land and territories.Municipal reimbursement may include reimbursement of costs associated with the cleanup and abatement of packaging material litter.NWRA would support legislation that requires the SRO to improve recycling through many approaches, including supporting litter cleanup.A portion of program funds should be used for packaging-related litter and debris prevention and abatement.The PRO must coordinate with the state on litter prevention.The cost coverage must include litter and marine debris cleanup and prevention programs.
Market DevelopmentThe stewardship organization plan must include market development mechanisms for recyclable and compostable materials, including those materials likely to contaminate plastics.The policy position indicates possible ways that recycling system goals could be enabled through policy, including end market development.The program is structured to provide fund distribution via grants for end market development programs.Future recycling legislation should fund infrastructure improvements to the current systems. Focusing on upgrades to existing systems and developing new markets for recycled materials is key for NWRA. A portion of program funds should also be used to develop markets and infrastructure to increase the recovery of covered materials.The bill requires producer investments into the development of markets for recycled material from covered products.The bill requires producer investments into the development of markets for recycled material from covered products.The program plan must describe how PROs will strategically invest in existing and future reuse and recycling infrastructure and market development in the state, including equipment to improve sorting and reduce contamination, and capital expenditures for new technology, equipment, and facilities.The cost coverage must ensure that covered products collected for recycling will be transferred to responsible end markets.The cost coverage must ensure that covered products collected for recycling will be transferred to responsible end markets.
Infrastructure ImprovementsThe policy position indicates possible ways that recycling system goals could be enabled through policy, including infrastructure upgrades.The policy position states that all generated funds from financing mechanism must be dedicated exclusively to improving the recycling system, enhancing recycling infrastructure, and educating consumers.The program will provide funding for infrastructure and market development, including criteria for infrastructure investment.Each producer or PRO must invest in reuse and recycling infrastructure and market development in Washington state.Each PRO must invest in reuse and recycling infrastructure and market development in the state. This includes installing or upgrading equipment to improve sorting and processing, and capital expenditures for new technology, equipment, and facilities.The cost coverage must make investments in recycling infrastructure. The cost coverage must include funds to make investments in infrastructure.During the first 10 years of program implementation, a minimum of 50% of program expenditures must be used for the improvement and development of new market, recycling, or composting infrastructure in the United States. This may include installing or upgrading equipment at existing sorting and reprocessing facility to improve sorting of covered product waste or to mitigate the impacts of covered product waste to other commodities. After 10 years, a minimum of 10% of expenditures must be used for these purposes.The program is structured to provide fund distribution through grants, with the priority for funding infrastructure improvements. The stewardship organization will consider grant proposals designed to support or improve recyclable material sorting or processing technology or infrastructure in the state. The program may also support proposals designed to support or improve advanced recycling technology or infrastructure and proposals designed to support or expand composting infrastructure in the state.Program funds will be used to support investments in infrastructure.Program funds will be used to support investments in infrastructure.Future recycling legislation should fund infrastructure improvements to the current systems. Focusing on upgrades to existing systems and developing new markets for recycled materials is key for NWRA. The producer responsibility plan must describe how the PRO will invest in reuse and recycling infrastructure, including improved sorting equipment and reduced contamination, and capital expenditures for new technology, equipment, and facilities.The program plan must also include a strategic capital investment plan and a mechanism to disperse funds for existing and future infrastructure.The program plan must describe how PROs will strategically invest in existing and future reuse and recycling infrastructure and market development in the state, including equipment to improve sorting and reduce contamination, and capital expenditures for new technology, equipment, and facilities.Each producer or PRO must invest in reuse and recycling infrastructure and market development in Washington state.The program plan must describe how PRO fees will be distributed to processors to improve infrastructure.The program plan must describe how PRO fees will be distributed to processors to improve infrastructure.Funding from the proposed fees would go towards system improvements, including collection infrastructure to improve recycling access (curbside recycling carts, drop-off sites, multifamily, public space containers, collection trucks, and hub-and-spoke transfer systems). The fees would also cover processing infrastructure to incentivize facility improvements and equipment upgrades, including enhancements within the MRF system that benefit the overall recycling system.
Social Considerations
Labor RequirementsAny contractors utilized under a producer responsibility plan must meet high labor standards.Covered products collected by the program must be managed in an environmentally sound and socially just manner at facilities operating with human health and environmental protection standards that are broadly equivalent to or better than those required in the United States and other countries that are members of the OECD. All contract service providers must meet requirements, including operating in an environmentally sound and socially just manner, meeting high labor standards, and provide fair opportunities.The product stewardship plan must describe how the PRO will ensure sound management practices for worker health and safety.Standards proposed in the stewardship plan must include wage and safety improvement plans for individuals working at or under municipal recycling and composting sites or programs.Any contractors utilized under a producer responsibility plan must meet high labor standards.
Community OutreachThe PRO must consult stakeholders in the development of education and outreach materials, and must develop and provide outreach and education to the diverse ethnic populations in the state.All plans must include a description of actions to be taken to work with and achieve the goals of underserved and underrepresented communities that bear a disproportionate share of adverse environmental, social justice, and economic impacts through socially just management practices including community outreach and engagement in the appropriate language of the impacted communities and meaningful consultation.PROs must detail their plans to work with and achieve the goals of underserved and underrepresented communities, including meaningful consultation, community outreach, and engagement in the appropriate language of the impacted communities. Plan development must offer various formats and languages for presenting the plan and receiving comments including workshops, surveys, webinars, and one-on-one meetings. The plan must provide outreach and educational resources that are conceptually, linguistically, and culturally accurate for the communities served and reach the state's diverse ethnic populations, including through meaningful consultation with communities that bear disproportionately higher levels of adverse environmental and social justice impacts.The PRO must develop educational resources that are culturally responsive to diverse audiences across this state, including people who speak languages other than English and people with disabilities.The program must include developing and providing outreach and education to the diverse ethnic populations of the United States through translated and culturally appropriate materials, including in-language and targeted outreach.Funds from the program will be awarded to support recycling and education efforts in financially challenged or otherwise disadvantaged municipalities or communities and in other municipalities or communities.Funds from the program will be awarded to increase access to recycling infrastructure, improve consumer education regarding recycling and recyclability, and equitably support recycling and education efforts in participating municipalities, particularly in those participating municipalities that have received minimal or no prior funding.The PRO must consult stakeholders in the development of education and outreach materials, and must develop and provide outreach and education to the diverse ethnic populations in the state.The PRO must consult stakeholders in the development of education and outreach materials, and must develop and provide outreach and education to the diverse ethnic populations in the state.The PRO must consult stakeholders in the development of education and outreach materials, and must develop and provide outreach and education to the diverse ethnic populations in the state.The PRO must consult stakeholders in the development of education and outreach materials, and must develop and provide outreach and education to the diverse ethnic populations in the state.The stewardship plan must be easy to understand, easily accessible, and provide for outreach and education that are designed to achieve covered materials and products management goals and requirements, including the prevention of contamination of covered materials and products.All plans must include a description of actions to be taken to work with and achieve the goals of underserved and underrepresented communities that bear a disproportionate share of adverse environmental, social justice, and economic impacts through socially just management practices including community outreach and engagement in the appropriate language of the impacted communities and meaningful consultation.Educational resources and campaigns must be culturally responsive to diverse audiences across the state, including people who speak languages other than English and people with disabilities. The resources must be printed or produced in languages other than English and accessed easily and at no cost to local governments and users of the recycling system.Educational resources and campaigns must be culturally responsive to diverse audiences across the state, including people who speak languages other than English and people with disabilities. The resources must be printed or produced in languages other than English and accessed easily and at no cost to local governments and users of the recycling system.This position states that areas of focus for state and local governments should include resources and support for community collection.
Socially Just ManagementSocially just management must be addressed in the plan. Socially just management practices are those that allow every individual to benefit from the same economic, political, and social rights, privileges, and opportunities, free from socioeconomic status, regardless of: Race; health disparities; age; sex, including on the basis of gender identity or orientation; disability; religion; or other characteristics. These practices also must not disproportionately impact any community and in particular communities in the state or elsewhere that bear disproportionately higher levels of adverse environmental, social justice, and economic impacts. This bill requires the program to operate with socially just management. Socially just management means practices that allow every individual to benefit from the same economic, political, and social rights, privileges, and opportunities, and do not disproportionately impact any community and in particular communities in the state or elsewhere that bear disproportionately higher levels of adverse environmental, social justice, and economic impacts.The state and the advisory council will conduct an equity study and make recommendations for improvement. The PRO will use this report and recommendations to make improvements to their program plan. The study must include challenges facing residents of multifamily housing and make recommendations for improvements to allow for effective and equitable recycling opportunities for residents of multifamily housing.The bill requires covered products to be managed in an environmentally sound and socially just manner at reprocessing, disposal, or other facilities operating with human health and environmental protection standards that are broadly equivalent to the standards required in the U.S. or other countries that are members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).Socially just management must be addressed in the plan. Socially just management practices are those that allow every individual to benefit from the same economic, political, and social rights, privileges, and opportunities, free from socioeconomic status, regardless of: Race; health disparities; age; sex, including on the basis of gender identity or orientation; disability; religion; or other characteristics. These practices also must not disproportionately impact any community and in particular communities in the state or elsewhere that bear disproportionately higher levels of adverse environmental, social justice, and economic impacts.The state, local governments, and the Oregon Recycling System Advisory Council, shall conduct a study of equity in Oregon’s recycling system to determine conditions and make recommendations, including goals to achieve continuous improvement. The department shall provide public involvement opportunities for underserved communities during the study. The state, local governments, and the Oregon Recycling System Advisory Council, shall conduct a study of equity in Oregon’s recycling system to determine conditions and make recommendations, including goals to achieve continuous improvement. The department shall provide public involvement opportunities for underserved communities during the study. There must be an equity study every 4 years. DEQ, in consultation with the Oregon Recycling System Advisory Council, shall conduct a statewide needs assessment to determine the challenges facing residents of multifamily housing and make recommendations for improvements to allow for effective and equitable recycling opportunities for residents of multifamily housing. There must be a multifamily house needs assessment every 4 years.
Fee Structure
Fixed RateThe fee structure includes a base fee rate for all covered products sold or distributed in this state. The base fee paid by each producer is calculated by multiplying the base fee rate by the total mass of covered products sold or distributed.The PRO program plan must establish base fee rates for all covered products sold or distributed in this state by the producers registered with the extended producer responsibility organization.The fee structure includes a base fee rate for all covered products sold or distributed in this state. The base fee paid by each producer is for producers generating between one and 15 tons of covered materials annually.The fee structure includes an annual fee paid by a responsible party to the stewardship organization. The fee is based on a responsible party's annual sales within the state.Low-volume producers may elect to pay a flat fee in lieu of a material-specific producer payment. Low-volume producer means a producer that sold, offered for sale, or distributed for sale in or into the State products using more than one ton but less than 15 tons of packaging material in total in the previous year.Low-volume producers may elect to pay a flat fee on a tiered basis in lieu of a material-specific producer payment. Low-volume producer means a producer that sold, offered for sale, or distributed for sale in or into the State products using more than one ton but less than 15 tons of packaging material in total in the previous year.The fee structure should allow for a tiered flat fee on small-to-mid-sized businesses. Producers who are eligible for this should have the option to pay the flat fee with no requirement to report, or choose to pay fees in accordance with the set fee schedule and provide a detailed report.
Product-RelatedThe fee structure may also include fees established per product, material, or category and assessed based on amount put on market.One potential policy avenue is a per item fee, incurred either before or at retail point of sale. The policy position states that this fee could possibly be focused on items that include non-recyclable or hard-to-recycle packaging.The position supports fees paid by producers that reflect the actual cost of collection and sorting or material. Fees should also reflect material revenue and should be updated once a year as costs and commodity values change.The program plan will include details on how the stewardship organization will determine fees to cover all required costs.The fee structure will charge additional base fees for covered products that are recoverable but have higher costs associated with their recovery or are not recoverable.The fee structure takes into consideration different materials and the costs associated with readily-recyclable and non-readily-recyclable covered materials.Fees charged to a responsible party will include the costs of management and cleanup of the covered product and administrative costs. In determining the fee for a responsible party, the PRO will consider the company size and annual revenue of the responsible party.The state will develop rules that determine payment calculations. This must include rules that require the amount of a producer's payment to reflect the per-ton costs associated with the collection, processing, transportation, and recycling or disposal of the producer's packaging material.The state will develop rules, with public input, that determine payment calculations. This must include rules that require the amount of a producer's payment to reflect the costs associated with managing the producer's packaging material.The program must establish material-specific base fee rates for all covered products sold or distributed in or into this state by members of the PRO. The program must establish material-specific base fee rates for all covered products sold or distributed in or into this state by members of the PRO. The PRO may propose an alternative fee structure, but must satisfy the requirements, provide incentives for environmental impact reduction, and establish uniform fees for producers with less than $10 million gross revenue in the recent fiscal year, or sold less than 5 metric tons of covered products.
ModulatedThe fee structure will be developed in the program plan. Within this structure, fees may vary based on costs associated with collection and processing, as well design features such as ease of recyclability or reusability (eco-modulation).CGF states that eco-modulation of fees, when it provides clear, predictable, and harmonised incentives, can be a mechanism for driving sustainable packaging. The position highlights the potential added complexities of non-harmonized incentives across a region.The funding mechanism must include incentives for responsible parties based on design features that enhance recycling for covered materials that disrupt the solid waste or recycling system, are a common source of litter, or may only be managed through landfill disposal.Fees can be modulated and fee modulation should incorporate design for recycling and litter prevention as objectives.PROs are required to develop a system to collect charges to cover the costs of plan implementation. The fee structure must be developed in an environmentally sound and socially just manner that encourages the use of design attributes that reduce the environmental impacts of covered products, such as through the use of eco-modulated fees.The fee structure includes bonuses for covered products with a lower environmental impact and penalties for covered products with a higher environmental impact. Within the plan, the fee schedule must incentivize producers to continually reduce the environmental and human health impacts of covered products by offering fee adjustments to producers that make or have made changes to the ways in which they produce, use and market covered products.The fee structure must be established in the stewardship plan. Fees may be variable based on costs associated with transporting, collecting, and processing covered materials.The fee structure must incentivize operational efficiency and contamination reduction.Fees must take into account a variety of factors, including environmental impacts.The bill proposes fee modulation after five years of program implementation, or earlier if agreed upon. The modulation would allow for fee adjustments for packaging material based on certain factors, such as recyclability, recycled content, food waste reduction, and greenhouse gas emissions.The rules determining fee calculations must include consideration of modulated fees that encourage certain packaging characteristics, such as reusability and incorporation of recycled content.The rules determining fee calculations must include consideration of modulated fees that encourage certain packaging characteristics, such as reusability and incorporation of recycled content.The PRO should propose fee amounts annually for state approval. The established fees may be assessed by weight, per customer sales unit, or other measures, and may incorporate eco-modulation.The fee structure will be developed in the program plan. Within this structure, fees may vary based on costs associated with collection and processing, as well design features such as ease of recyclability or reusability, and the percentage of post-consumer recycled content used (eco-modulation).The fee structure will be developed in the program plan. Within this structure, fees may vary based on costs associated with collection and processing, as well design features such as ease of recyclability or reusability, and the percentage of post-consumer recycled content used (eco-modulation).The fee structure will be developed in the program plan. Within this structure, fees may vary based on costs associated with collection and processing, as well design features such as ease of recyclability or reusability, and the percentage of post-consumer recycled content used (eco-modulation).The fee structure will be developed in the program plan. Within this structure, fees may vary based on costs associated with collection and processing, as well design features such as ease of recyclability or reusability, and the percentage of post-consumer recycled content used (eco-modulation).Fees can be modulated and fee modulation should incorporate design for recycling and litter prevention as objectives.In addition to the base fees, a PRO's membership fee schedule must incentivize producers to continually reduce the environmental and human health impacts of covered products by offering fee adjustments to producers that make or have made changes to the ways in which they produce, use and market covered products.In addition to the base fees, a PRO's membership fee schedule must incentivize producers to continually reduce the environmental and human health impacts of covered products by offering fee adjustments to producers that make or have made changes to the ways in which they produce, use and market covered products.The position supports policy solutions that include establishing a public-private partnership, with funds derived from eco-modulated fees collected from brand owners and distributed toward recycling system improvements.The funding plan established by the PSO would require producers to pay a fee based on the amount of packaging and printed paper sold, taking into account material characteristics and impacts on the recycling system.To achieve the USPP's Target 3 to "undertake ambitious actions to effectively recycle or compost 50% of plastic packaging by 2025", the EPR framework will incentivize reuse, recyclability, and design for lower environmental impact through eco-modulation.
Eco-Modulation
Recycled ContentFees detailed in the producer responsibility plan will be adjusted based on percentage of post-consumer recycled material content.Fees will be modulated to provide incentives based on the post-consumer recycled content of covered materials.Fee modulation should encourage the use of recycled content.The bill suggests eco-modulated fees to encourage the use of recycled content.In establishing the criteria for a fee adjustment, a PRO must consider factors that include the post-consumer content of the material. A lower cost to covered products will be expected if a material has a lower environmental impacts, including covered products made of any combination of recycled or post consumer materials or materials derived from litter totaling at least 90 percent.In establishing the criteria for a fee adjustment, a stewardship organization must consider factors that include increased use of post-consumer recycled content material.Fees should take into account the percentage of post-consumer recycled content verified that exceeds the minimum requirements established under section this legislation in the packaging, if the recycled content does not disrupt the potential for future recycling.ISRI prefers policies that incentivize designing packaging for recyclability and use more recycled content in manufacturing and packaging, provided there are no negative implications to the product’s recyclability.The factors for future fee modulation include favorable fee adjustments based on the increased use of post-consumer recycled content in packaging material.Fee calculation may be structured to encourage the use of post-consumer recycled material in packaging material provided that such use does not increase the toxicity of packaging material.Rules determining fee calculation must include criteria to adjust payments in a manner that incentivizes the use of recycled content.Fees detailed in the producer responsibility plan will be adjusted based on percentage of post-consumer recycled material content.Fees detailed in the producer responsibility plan will be adjusted based on percentage of post-consumer recycled material content.Fees detailed in the producer responsibility plan will be adjusted based on percentage of post-consumer recycled material content.Fees detailed in the producer responsibility plan will be adjusted based on percentage of post-consumer recycled material content.The program plan will encourage participating producers to increase the post-consumer content in packaging products.Fee modulation should encourage the use of recycled content.A producer responsibility organization’s membership fee schedule must incentivize the post-consumer content of the material (if the use of post-consumer content in the covered product is not prohibited by federal law). A producer responsibility organization’s membership fee schedule must consider the post-consumer content of the material (if the use of post-consumer content in the covered product is not prohibited by federal law).The plan would offer eco-modulated discounts for packaging and printed paper that meet environmental design criteria, such as recyclability and recycled content.
Life Cycle Emissions In establishing the criteria for a fee adjustment, a PRO must consider factors that include life cycle environmental impacts, as demonstrated by an evaluation (LCA).Favorable fee adjustments may be based on the demonstration of greenhouse gas emissions reductions relating to the use of a packaging material type as compared to a previously used packaging material type or material commonly used for similar products.A producer responsibility organization’s membership fee schedule must incentivize life cycle environmental impacts, as demonstrated by an evaluation (LCA). A producer responsibility organization’s membership fee schedule must consider life cycle environmental impacts, as demonstrated by an evaluation (LCA).
ReuseThe bill suggests criteria for eco-modulation, but the structure will be determined in the development of the producer responsibility plan. The bill states that fees can encourage non-food contact packaging specifically designed to be reusable or refillable and have high reuse or refill rates.Fees will be modulated to provide incentives based on the ability to reuse a covered material.The plan may include discounted charges or favorable treatment of covered products deemed to be reusable provided there is an established basis for determining that products are typically reused a minimum number of times.The bill suggests eco-modulated fees to encourage designs intended to facilitate reuse.A lower cost to covered products will be expected if the products are specifically designed for reuse and have a high reuse rate.In establishing criteria for the fee adjustment, a stewardship organization must consider factors that include reuse and lifespan extension of packaging.Fees should take into account the lower cost of managing contact containers and other covered products that are specifically designed to be reusable or refillable and have a high reuse or refill rate.Fee calculation may be structured to encourage the reuse of packaging materials.Rules determining fee calculation must include criteria to adjust payments in a manner that incentivizes the reuse of packaging materials.The bill suggests criteria for eco-modulation, but the structure will be determined in the development of the producer responsibility plan. The bill states that fees can encourage non-food contact packaging specifically designed to be reusable or refillable and have high reuse or refill rates.The bill suggests criteria for eco-modulation, but the structure will be determined in the development of the producer responsibility plan. The bill states that fees can encourage non-food contact packaging specifically designed to be reusable or refillable and have high reuse or refill rates.The bill suggests criteria for eco-modulation, but the structure will be determined in the development of the producer responsibility plan. The bill states that fees can encourage packaging specifically designed to be reusable or refillable and have high reuse or refill rates.The bill suggests criteria for eco-modulation, but the structure will be determined in the development of the producer responsibility plan. The bill states that fees can encourage packaging specifically designed to be reusable or refillable and have high reuse or refill rates.The plan may include discounted charges or favorable treatment of covered products deemed to be reusable provided there is an established basis for determining that products are typically reused a minimum number of times.To achieve the USPP's Target 3 to "undertake ambitious actions to effectively recycle or compost 50% of plastic packaging by 2025", the EPR framework will incentivize reuse, recyclability, and design for lower environmental impact through eco-modulation.
Light WeightingIn establishing criteria for the fee adjustment, a stewardship organization must consider factors that include the minimum quantity of packaging necessary.
DesignFees will be modulated to include penalties or increased fees for covered materials that disrupt the solid waste or recycling system, are a common source of litter, or may only be managed through landfill disposal.Program charges be designed in a manner that encourages the use of design attributes that reduce the environmental impacts of covered products, such as through the use of eco-modulated fees.The producer responsibility plan must include a description of how producer fees and fee modulation will incorporate design for recycling and litter prevention as objectives. The bill suggests eco-modulated fees to encourage design attributes that reduce the environmental impacts of covered products including, but not limited to, the potential to create litter.In establishing the criteria for a fee adjustment, a PRO must consider factors that include the product-to-package ratio.A higher cost to covered products will be expected if a material has any of the following attributes: bonded materials, making it more difficult to recycle, such as plastic bonded with paper or metal; if a material would typically be recyclable, but as a consequence of the design of the covered product, has the effect of disrupting recycling processes; if a material includes labels, inks, liners and adhesives containing heavy metals or other toxic substances; or cannot be recycled. A lower cost to covered products will be expected if a material has any of the following attributes: non-detachable caps or other innovations and design characteristics to prevent littering.The stewardship plan must address how producers will work together to reduce packaging through product design and program innovations.Fees should take into account the higher cost of managing covered products that includes labels, inks, liners, and adhesives containing heavy metals other toxic substances. Fees should also consider the lower cost of managing beverage containers that have non-detachable caps or other innovations and design characteristics to prevent littering. Fees should consider covered products with lower environmental impacts, including compostable covered products that have direct contact with food or help divert food waste from a landfill.ISRI prefers policies that incentivize designing packaging for recyclability and use more recycled content in manufacturing and packaging, provided there are no negative implications to the product’s recyclability.Favorable fee adjustments may be based on alignment with existing optimization standards. Adjustments may also be based on the achievement of significant reduction in food waste generation or product breakage.Fee calculation may be structured to encourage design characteristics intended to reduce consumer confusion regarding recyclability and to reduce recycling contamination and any other incentives designed to support the management of packaging material consistent with the state's waste hierarchy.Rules determining fee calculation must include criteria to adjust payments in a manner that incentivizes design characteristics such as lower toxicity in packaging materials, a reduction in the amount of packaging materials used, and a reduction of litter from packaging material.EPR policy that focuses on end-of-life considerations, recyclability, and overall sustainability outcomes should be a priority for producers according to the NWRA.The agreement states that fees should be designed to minimize overall environmental and health impacts. Desired environmental outcomes should be included in legislation (eliminating/reducing material, eliminating toxic substances, design for reuse/longevity, recycled content, reduced impacts, recyclability). Eco-modulation of fees may be used to further incentivize desired environmental outcomes and disincentivize materials that become litter or marine debris.The program plan must describe the disincentives to discourage designs or practices that increase the cost of managing covered materials and products.The program plan will encourage producers to reduce the amount of packaging and material through design modifications.Program charges be designed in a manner that encourages the use of design attributes that reduce the environmental impacts of covered products, such as through the use of eco-modulated fees.A producer responsibility organization’s membership fee schedule must incentivize the product-to-package ratio.A producer responsibility organization’s membership fee schedule must consider the product-to-package ratio. A producer responsibility organization's membership fee schedule must also consider the producer’s choice of material.The Packaging and Printed Paper Fee would encourage packaging and printed paper design with recycling and end-of-use in mind.To achieve the USPP's Target 2 of "100% of plastic packaging will be reusable, recyclable, or compostable by 2025", the USPP will develop a benchmark of policies that support and incentivize design for recyclability, including the use of eco-modulation as part of EPR, as well as barriers to recyclability (inclusive of the incorporation of post-consumer recycled content). To achieve the USPP's Target 3 to "undertake ambitious actions to effectively recycle or compost 50% of plastic packaging by 2025", the EPR framework will incentivize reuse, recyclability, and design for lower environmental impact through eco-modulation.
RecyclabilityFees detailed in the producer responsibility plan should disincentivize covered materials that would typically be readily-recyclable but are made less recyclable by design features (labels, inks, adhesives containing heavy metals, other hazardous contaminants).One potential policy avenue is a per item fee, incurred either before or at retail point of sale. The policy position states that this fee could possibly be focused on items that include non-recyclable or hard-to-recycle packaging.Fees will be modulated to provide incentives based on the recyclability of covered materials.Fee modulation should encourage design for recycling and discourage the use of problematic materials that increase system costs of managing covered products.The bill suggests eco-modulated fees to encourage designs intended to facilitate recycling.In establishing the criteria for a fee adjustment, a PRO must consider factors that include the producer’s choice of material.The stewardship plan must address how producers will incentivize waste reduction and recycling and disincentivize designs or practices that increase costs of managing materials.In establishing the criteria for a fee adjustment, a stewardship organization must consider factors that include covered material waste reduction, use of readily-recyclable materials to manufacture covered materials, and domestic processing of covered materials.Fees should take into account the higher cost of managing covered products that bond materials together, making the covered product more difficult to recycle, such as plastic bonded with paper or metal, or products that would typically be recyclable or compostable, but, as a consequence of the design of the covered product, has the effect of disrupting recycling or composting processes. Fees should also consider the higher costs of managing products that cannot be mechanically recycled.The factors for future fee modulation include favorable fee adjustments based on the achievement of recyclability of packaging material that was previously not considered recyclable.Fee calculation may be structured to encourage the use of readily-recyclable material, as well as single-material packaging that includes prominent and easily understandable recycling or disposal instructions for consumers.Rules determining fee calculation must include criteria to adjust payments in a manner that incentivizes the increased recyclability of packaging material and labeling of packaging material to reduce consumer confusion.Fees detailed in the producer responsibility plan should disincentivize covered materials that would typically be readily-recyclable but are made less recyclable by design features (labels, inks, adhesives containing heavy metals, other hazardous contaminants).Fees detailed in the producer responsibility plan should disincentivize covered materials that would typically be readily-recyclable but are made less recyclable by design features (labels, inks, adhesives containing heavy metals, other hazardous contaminants).Fees detailed in the producer responsibility plan should disincentivize covered materials that would typically be readily-recyclable but are made less recyclable by design features (labels, inks, adhesives containing heavy metals, other hazardous contaminants).Fees detailed in the producer responsibility plan should disincentivize covered materials that would typically be readily-recyclable but are made less recyclable by design features (labels, inks, adhesives containing heavy metals, other hazardous contaminants).Fee modulation should encourage design for recycling and discourage the use of problematic materials that increase system costs of managing covered products.A producer responsibility organization's membership fee schedule must consider the recycling rate of the material relative to the recycling rate of other covered products. The plan would offer eco-modulated discounts for packaging and printed paper that meet environmental design criteria, such as recyclability and recycled content.To achieve the USPP's Target 3 to "undertake ambitious actions to effectively recycle or compost 50% of plastic packaging by 2025", the EPR framework will incentivize reuse, recyclability, and design for lower environmental impact through eco-modulation.
Renewably SourcedA lower cost to covered products will be expected if a material has lower environmental impacts, including covered products made of sustainable or renewably sourced materials. Fees should take into account covered products with lower environmental impacts, including those made of sustainable or renewably sourced materials. Fees should also account for covered products that are made of at least 90 percent by weight of any combination of post-consumer recycled content or materials derived from land or freshwater or marine environment litter.
Infrastructure
Maximizes Use of Existing InfrastructureA stewardship plan and budget shall prioritize the use and expansion of remanufacturing and collection infrastructure in the state.The position states that industry investment should not duplicate or compete with successful programs and initiatives. Rather, industry investments should be directed in ways that leverage, complement and/or strengthen recycling processes and programs. The program must utilize all recovery facilities in existence on July 1, 2021 at the capacity of those facilities on that date.PRO(s) are encouraged to use and interact with established recycling programs and infrastructure. City contracts and government utility services can be maintained.A producer responsibility program plan must maximize the use of existing infrastructure.The product stewardship plan must include a description of how producers will work with, improve, and fund existing recycling, composting, litter cleanup, and disposal programs and infrastructure.The position states that recycling legislation should seek to support and invigorate existing recycling systems by strengthening them rather than upending them with duplicative and unnecessary programs. To the extent practicable, a packaging product stewardship plan is to provide for the use of existing solid waste collection and recycling infrastructure in the State.PRO(s) are encouraged to use and interact with established recycling programs and infrastructure. City contracts and government utility services can be maintained.The program must maximize the use of existing infrastructure.The program must maximize the use of existing infrastructure.
Convenience StandardsThe program must cover the cost of curbside collection or other level of consumer service that is, at minimum, as convenient as curbside collection or as convenient as the previous recycling collection service in the particular jurisdiction.The program plan must comply with state law for the collection of covered materials, including existing requirements for the collection of mandated recyclables. The plan must allow all public and privately owned collection locations to opt to be a collection facility for covered materials and allow all curbside collection providers to opt to be a curbside collection service provider for covered material.In every jurisdiction in which covered products are sold or supplied to consumers, a PRO must ensure convenient collection services are available for the full list of covered products designated for collection in the plan. PROs must ensure the availability of convenient collection services for all covered products. This includes curbside collection and alternate collection sites which provide free and equitable access. The bill further defines convenient access at alternate sites to mean a reasonable opportunity to drop off covered materials at collection events for underserved areas where the population does not have a permanent collection location within a fifteen mile radius.A stewardship program shall provide widespread, convenient, and equitable access to opportunities for the collection of covered products. Collection opportunities must be provided throughout each state, Tribal land, and territory in which the applicable covered product is sold, including in rural and island communities, and be as convenient as trash collection in the applicable area. In a case in which curbside collection is not practicable, and in cities of 750,000 or more residents, collection opportunities must be made available for not less than 95% of the population within a 10-minute walk in an urban area or, in a rural area, the longer of a 45-minute drive and the time to drive to the nearest rural service center.Standards proposed in the stewardship plan must include minimum standards designed to ensure access to recycling and composting collection or drop-off for residents of the state.The position states that the EPR recycling program should, at minimum, continue at the same level of service as the existing recycling program.The program must cover the cost of curbside collection or other level of consumer service that is, at minimum, as convenient as curbside collection or as convenient as the previous recycling collection service in the particular jurisdiction.A producer or PRO must provide for widespread, convenient, and equitable access to collection opportunities. The producer responsibility program must cover the costs of curbside collection or other level of service that is, at minimum, as convenient as curbside collection or as convenient as the previous recycling collection service in the particular jurisdiction. If recycling was not previously provided, the service must be as convenient as the previous refuse collection service.A producer or PRO must provide for widespread, convenient, and equitable access to collection opportunities. The producer responsibility program must cover the costs of curbside collection or other level of service that is, at minimum, as convenient as curbside collection or as convenient as the previous recycling collection service in the particular jurisdiction. If recycling was not previously provided, the service must be as convenient as the previous refuse collection service.A producer or PRO must provide for widespread, convenient, and equitable access to collection opportunities. The producer responsibility program must cover the costs of curbside collection or other level of service that is, at minimum, as convenient as curbside collection or as convenient as the previous recycling collection service in the particular jurisdiction. If recycling was not previously provided, the service must be as convenient as the previous refuse collection service.In every jurisdiction in which covered products are sold or supplied to consumers, a PRO must ensure convenient collection services are available for the full list of covered products designated for collection in the plan. A producer responsibility organization shall work with local governments, collection service providers, and other affected parties to provide recycling service to multifamily properties that do not receive recycling service or that do not meet standards for adequate recycling service.A producer responsibility organization shall work with local governments, collection service providers, and other affected parties to provide recycling service to multifamily properties that do not receive recycling service or that do not meet standards for adequate recycling service. A PRO must also meet convenience standards and collection targets for “producer-collected materials,” to be established during a rulemaking process.
Infrastructure ImprovementsThe stewardship plan must include improvements or expansion of recycling and composting infrastructure.The policy position indicates possible ways that recycling system goals could be enabled through policy, including infrastructure upgrades.The position recommends that generated funds should be used for improving the recycling system and enhancing recycling infrastructure.Each producer or PRO must invest in reuse and recycling infrastructure and market development in the state.Each PRO must invest in reuse and recycling infrastructure and market development in the state. This includes installing or upgrading equipment to improve sorting and processing, and capital expenditures for new technology, equipment, and facilities. Infrastructure investments must be detailed in the PRO's annual report.The PRO program plan must describe how the PRO will invest in recycling infrastructure to ensure that covered products can be recycled throughout the state. The stewardship organization plan must ensure that 8% of their budget is used for infrastructure.Program funds expended on education and infrastructure will be proportional to the payments from fees for packaging material that is not readily recyclable and is not actually recycled. Proposals for infrastructure improvements will be evaluated by the state and funds awarded to applicants, with preference given to proposals that support the state's solid waste management hierarchy, promote a circular economy for packaging, increase the recyclability of packaging material that is not readily recyclable, and increase access to recycling infrastructure in the state.The stewardship organization will make investments in education and infrastructure that support the recycling of packaging material in the state. Preference for funding will be given to proposals that promote a circular economy for covered packaging materials and increase access to recycling infrastructure in the state.The agreement supports requirements for the stewardship plan to outline how the recycling program will build on and expand existing recycling opportunities to recover covered materials.The producer responsibility plan must describe how the PRO will invest in reuse and recycling infrastructure and market development in the state, including improved sorting equipment and reduced contamination, and capital expenditures for new technology, equipment, and facilities.The producer responsibility plan must describe how the PRO will invest in reuse and recycling infrastructure and market development in the state, including improved sorting equipment and reduced contamination, and capital expenditures for new technology, equipment, and facilities.The program plan must describe how PROs will strategically invest in existing and future reuse and recycling infrastructure and market development in the state, including equipment to improve sorting and reduce contamination, and capital expenditures for new technology, equipment, and facilities.Each producer or PRO must invest in reuse and recycling infrastructure and market development in the state.The program plan must describe how PRO fees will be distributed to processors to improve infrastructure.The program plan must describe how PRO fees will be distributed to processors to improve infrastructure.SFPA supports policy that ensures a nationally consistent, economy-wide approach to packaging life cycle management by establishing a public-private partnership that can make recycling infrastructure improvements to drive the transition to a circular economy. SFPA also supports the adoption of policy measures that improve the effectiveness of recycling systems to achieve increased recycling rates, decreased landfilling, and recycling price parity with disposal. The position states that areas of focus for state and local governments should include infrastructure investments.Fees would be used for system improvements, including collection infrastructure to improve recycling access, including curbside recycling carts, drop-off sites, multifamily, public space containers, collection trucks, and hub-and-spoke transfer systems. Funding would also go to processing infrastructure to incentivize facility improvements and equipment upgrades, including enhancements within the MRF system that benefit the overall recycling system.
Additional Policy Levers
Deposit Refund SystemThe position recommends that, prior to considering any new fees or taxes, states with existing deposit refund systems should recommit funds from existing or unclaimed bottle deposits to finance the recycling system.EMF recommends a comprehensive circular economy approach, which can include complementary policies beyond EPR. The paper suggests policy options that may be considered to achieve the goal of managing resources to preserve value, including Deposit Return Schemes (DRS). The paper suggests that DRS could be included as a part of an EPR plan, as these schemes a proven mechanism to increase reuse and recycling rates.This bill establishes a National Beverage Container Program. Under this program, producers of beverage containers will charge a deposit to a retailer on delivery and pay a refund to the retailer on receipt of an empty covered beverage container. Retailers will charge a deposit to the customer and provide a refund on return of a covered beverage container. The refund amount will be a minimum of 10 cents and may be increased after three years based on inflation and other relevant factors. States with existing bottle deposit legislation may continue to operate such a program or negotiate with PROs to update existing legislation.To achieve the USPP's Target 3 to "undertake ambitious actions to effectively recycle or compost 50% of plastic packaging by 2025", the EPR framework will offer flexibility for deposit return systems (DRS) to meet beverage packaging recycling rates. A key activity towards this goal is to support DRS working in parallel with EPR or separately as needed, to drive increased participation in recycling programs, expanded infrastructure, and higher material quality.
Landfill SurchargesLandfill tipping fee: One policy lever option presented is an additional fee levied on waste disposal in landfill. These intent of these fees would be to raise the price of landfilling to create parity with recycling. The position notes that it only works where landfilling is noticeably less expensive. Waste Generator Fee: Another policy lever option presented is a set fee charged to all entities (companies, consumers, businesses, etc.) based on how much waste is send to landfill. The position indicates that these funds would be used to pay for waste and recycling services.EMF recommends a comprehensive circular economy approach, which can include complementary policies beyond EPR. The paper suggests policy options that may be considered to achieve the goal of making the economics work, including disincentives for non-circular outcomes, for example through a landfill tax or ban or incineration gate fees.SFPA supports the adoption of policy measures that improve the effectiveness of recycling systems to achieve increased recycling rates, decreased landfilling, and recycling price parity with disposal. The position states that areas of focus for state and local governments should include disposal surcharges.The policy position proposes a Disposal Surcharge to support community recycling operations. The surcharge would be imposed on landfills, solid waste incinerators, and waste-to-energy facilities and paid on a per-ton basis by the facility operators for all waste disposed at these facilities. Funds generated from the Disposal Surcharge would be held in a dedicated fund and be distributed to state or local governments, on a per capita basis to help offset recycling program operational costs.
Pay as You Throw PoliciesA potential financing option explored in this position is a Pay as You Throw (PAYT) policy. Under this type of policy, residents are charged a fee for waste disposal, such as per bag. The position indicates that funds would be used for waste and recycling services.
Recycled Content MinimumsEMF recommends a comprehensive circular economy approach, which can include complementary policies beyond EPR. The paper suggests policy options that may be considered to achieve the goal of stimulating design for the circular economy, including setting mandatory minimum recycled content targets for specific packaging types.The state may adopt rules to implement, administer, and enforce minimum postconsumer recycled content of covered products, and to adjust minimum required postconsumer recycled content. The bill specifies minimum recycled content targets for plastic beverage containers. Recycled content minimums for other covered products will be determined by the state. The bill authorizes the state to adopt rules to implement, administer, and enforce minimum post-consumer recycled content of covered products, and to adjust minimum post-consumer recycled content.This bill requires beverage manufacturers that offer for sale, sell, or distribute beverages in plastic beverage containers in the State to meet minimum post-consumer recycled content. This regulation would go into effect on January 1, 2023. The post-consumer recycled content minimums proposed in the bill require plastic beverage containers to include: 1. No less than 15% post-consumer recycled plastic by weight by December 31, 2025 2. No less than 25% post-consumer recycled plastic by weight by December 31, 2030 3. No less than 50% post-consumer recycled plastic by weight on and after January 1, 2031.Recycled content minimums for plastic beverage containers are included in this bill. The amount of post-consumer recycled content from US sources used to make the plastic beverage containers must be, at a minimum: 1. 25% by 2025 2. 50% by 2030 3. 70% by 2035 4. 80% by 2040The NWRA prefers legislation that focuses on the improvement of end markets through the use of post-consumer materials in both manufacturing/processing and products. The product type should determine the level of PCR and governments should require PCR purchasing policies when appropriate. The state may adopt rules to implement, administer, and enforce minimum postconsumer recycled content of covered products, and to adjust minimum required postconsumer recycled content. This bill establishes a minimum recycled content requirement for plastic beverage containers.This bill establishes a minimum recycled content requirement for plastic beverage containers, trash bags, and household cleaning and personal care product containers.To achieve the USPP's Target 4 of "average of 30% recycled content or responsibly-sourced, bio-based content by 2025", a key activity is to develop a benchmark of existing policies including the use of mandatory recycled content and eco-modulation levers to assess potential impacts of different approaches. Another key activity is to support post-consumer recycled content mandates and procurement policies in coordination with strong programs and policies like EPR and DRS to assist the collection and sortation of recyclable plastic packaging.
Mandatory RecyclingEMF recommends a comprehensive circular economy approach, which can include complementary policies beyond EPR. The paper suggests policy options that may be considered to achieve the goal of managing resources to preserve value, including mandatory collection for recycling for all packaging (for residential, industrial, and commercial locations, and public spaces).
Product or Material BansEMF recommends a comprehensive circular economy approach, which can include complementary policies beyond EPR. The paper suggests policy options that may be considered to achieve the goal of stimulating design for the circular economy, including banning some of the most problematic packaging items.This bill also includes a regulation to prohibit the sale or distribution of expanded polystyrene (EPS) foodservice products, coolers, and packing peanuts.This bill would prohibit a full-service restaurant from providing single-use plastic service ware to a consumer unless requested. This would go into effect on January 1, 2022.This bill includes prohibitions on single-use plastic carryout bags and single-use plastic utensils and straws, effective January 1, 2023.This bill also includes a regulation to prohibit the sale or distribution of expanded polystyrene (EPS) foodservice products, coolers, and packing peanuts.This bill prohibits the sales of certain expanded polystyrene (EPS) products, including: - Portable EPS coolers (not for medical or wholesale/retail shipping) - Food service products that (food containers, plates, clam shell-style containers, and hot and cold beverage cups) - Void filling packaging products (packing peanuts) Single-use food service products are also regulated. Food service businesses with on-site dining must only provide certain single-use food service products on request. These include utensils, straws, condiment packaging, and beverage cup lids.This bill prohibits the sales of certain expanded polystyrene (EPS) products, including: - Portable EPS coolers (not for medical or wholesale/retail shipping) - Food service products that (food containers, plates, clam shell-style containers, and hot and cold beverage cups) - Void filling packaging products (packing peanuts) Single-use food service products are also regulated. Food service businesses with on-site dining must only provide certain single-use food service products on request. These include utensils, straws, condiment packaging, and beverage cup lids.
Timelines
Deadline to RegisterProducers must register by April 1, 2022 in order to sell or distribute product after July 1, 2022.Producers are required to register annually as as individual PRO or part of a third-party PRO.Beginning on February 1, 2023, producers must be a member of a PRO with an approved plan.The deadline for all responsible parties to submit a proposal for establishing a stewardship organization, individually or collectively, is October 1, 2023.Producers must register by April 1, 2022 in order to sell or distribute product after July 1, 2022.
Deadline to Submit PlanProducers will have one year from the effective date of this legislation to submit a plan. The plan will cover a five-year period, and be reviewed and updated every five years.Before January 1, 2023, a stewardship organization representing responsible parties must submit a producer responsibility program plan to the state for review.All producers or PROs must submit a program plan to the state by Jan 1, 2024.The deadline to submit a plan is included in the legislation, but the actual calendar date is not specified (likely to be agreed upon later in the legislative process).A producer responsibility organization shall submit a program plan to the state by July 1, 2022.Producers must submit a stewardship plan, either individually or as part of a stewardship organization, on or before 1 October 2022.The PRO must submit a program plan to the state within 8 months of the effective regulation.Not later than February 1, 2023, each PRO is required to submit a Product Stewardship Plan that describes how the PRO will carry out the responsibilities outlined in the legislation.The deadline for all stewardship organizations to submit a plan for establishing a packaging stewardship program is October 1, 2024.Producers will have one year from the effective date of this legislation to submit a plan. The plan will cover a five-year period, and be reviewed and updated every five years.Producers will have one year from the effective date of this legislation to submit a plan. The plan will cover a five-year period, and be reviewed and updated every five years.The stewardship organization must submit program plans by October 1, 2022. On or before January 1, 2022, each producer must, individually or as part of a stewardship organization, submit a stewardship plan to the state for review and approval.The PRO must submit a stewardship plan no later than 180 days after the enactment.All producers or PROs must submit a program plan to the state by Jan 1, 2024.PROs must submit their first program plan to the state by March 31, 2024.PROs must submit their first program plan to the state by March 31, 2024.
Date of ImplementationThe date of program implementation is three years from the effective date of this legislation.Producers must form or join a stewardship organization within the first 6 months of the adoption of this regulation.Beginning on July 1, 2023, a responsible party is prohibited from selling, offering for sale, distributing, or delivering covered material to a consumer or retail establishment unless the responsible party is registered with the state and participating in a stewardship organization implementing an approved program plan.All approved program plans must be implemented by July 1, 2025.The date of implementation is included in the legislation, but the actual calendar date is not specified (likely to be agreed upon later in the legislative process).Requires extended producer responsibility organization to first implement program no later than July 1, 2025.No sales of covered materials or products in the state will be permitted without approved plan on file on or after 1 October 2024. A stewardship organization will have six months to implement a plan after it has been approved.Beginning on August 1, 2023, not later than 60 days after receiving a notification of approval of a program plan, the PRO will begin implementation of the plan.Approved packaging stewardship programs must be implemented no later than January 1, 2025, unless a later date is approved by the state.Beginning one calendar year following the effective date of the stewardship organization's contract, a producer may not sell, offer for sale, or distribute for sale in or into the state a product contained, protected, delivered, presented or distributed in or using packaging material if they have not complied with this regulation.No later than 180 days following the effective date of the stewardship organization's contract, a producer may not sell, offer for sale, or distribute for sale in or into the state a product contained, protected, delivered, presented or distributed in or using packaging material if they have not complied with this regulation.The date of program implementation is three years from the effective date of this legislation.The date of program implementation is three years from the effective date of this legislation.The date of program implementation is four years from the effective date of this legislation.The date of program implementation is four years from the effective date of this legislation.The stewardship organization must implement the program plan no later than 60 days after approval from the state.On or after June 1, 2022, a producer may not sell, offer for sale, distribute, or import for sale or distribution covered materials or products for use in the state unless the producer, individually or as part of a stewardship organization, has an approved stewardship plan on file with the state.If the stewardship plan is approved, the plan must be implemented within 90 days.All approved program plans must be implemented by July 1, 2025.
Transition PeriodThe implementation of this legislation includes a 4-year transition period and consultation process.The implementation of this legislation includes a 4-year transition period and consultation process.
Government Role and Administration
Plan Review and ApprovalThe state has the authority to review and approve plans submitted by producers or PROs. The state may also require a plan to be reviewed or revised prior to the five year period if factors such as minimum post-consumer recycled material content rates, minimum recycling rates are not being met, or if there has been a change in circumstances that warrants revision of the plan.A stewardship organization must develop and submit to the state a plan and budget within the first 6 months of the adoption of this regulation.The state is responsible for reviewing and approving or denying program plans submitted under this regulation.The state must review all new, updated, and revised plans submitted by producers.The state is responsible for reviewing new, updated, and revised plans submitted by producer responsibility organizations.The department will approve, approve with modifications, or reject a plan submitted by the PRO no later than 120 days after the received date. The state shall approve a plan (or an amendment) if the PRO submits a completed plan and the proposed plan or amendment meets the requirements.The PRO must make the state aware of any changes to the program plan in writing no less than once a month.The state has the authority to review plan and associated auditor report. The state must approve or reject the plan within 90 days based on adherence to the requirements in the bill and adequate consultation with stakeholders.The state will review the PRO plan and any amendments to the plan. The state will approve or deny the plan within 90 days of receipt.Not later than 90 days after receiving a product stewardship plan from a PRO, the Administrator will approve or deny the Plan and notify the applicable PRO of the decision.The state will review proposals for the formation of stewardship organizations and approve, require modifications to, or reject the proposal. The state will review submitted stewardship plans and approve or reject the plan, or require revisions.This bill requires potential stewardship organizations to bid for a contract to operate the packaging stewardship program for the state. During the bidding process, bidders will submit a program proposal. The state will review the proposal and enter into a contract that must cover 10 years of operation of the packaging stewardship program.This bill requires potential stewardship organizations to bid for a contract to operate the packaging stewardship program for the state. During the bidding process, bidders will submit a program proposal. The state will review the proposal and enter into a contract that must cover 10 years of operation of the packaging stewardship program.The state government should have approval authority on all aspects of the stewardship plan, including improvements, changes, and targets.The state has the authority to review and approve plans submitted by producers or PROs. The state may also require a plan to be reviewed or revised prior to the five year period if factors such as minimum post-consumer recycled material content rates, minimum recycling rates are not being met, or if there has been a change in circumstances that warrants revision of the plan.The state has the authority to review and approve plans submitted by producers or PROs. The state may also require a plan to be reviewed or revised prior to the five year period if factors such as minimum post-consumer recycled material content rates, minimum recycling rates are not being met, or if there has been a change in circumstances that warrants revision of the plan.The state has the authority to review and approve plans submitted by producers or PROs. The state may also require a plan to be reviewed or revised prior to the five year period if factors such as minimum post-consumer recycled material content rates, minimum recycling rates are not being met, or if there has been a change in circumstances that warrants revision of the plan.The state has the authority to review and approve plans submitted by producers or PROs. The state may also require a plan to be reviewed or revised prior to the five year period if the PRO is not on target to meet minimum post-consumer recycled material content rates, minimum recycling rates, or other required components.The state will approve or reject a program plan no later than 60 days after receipt. The state will review and approve submitted plans and may rescind approval of a stewardship plan at any time.The state will approve, conditionally approve, or disapprove the plan and provide written notice of the determination to the participating producers within 120 days.The state must review all new, updated, and revised plans submitted by producers.The state shall approve, approve with conditions or reject a plan submitted, or an amendment to a plan, no later than 120 days after the date on which the department receives the plan or plan amendment from the PRO. The state shall approve, approve with conditions or reject a plan submitted, or an amendment to a plan, no later than 120 days after the date on which the department receives the plan or plan amendment from the PRO.Following the needs assessment study, the PSO would develop a plan, based on the needs of the system, to submit to the state or federal government agency overseeing it. The state or federal agency would approve the formation of the PSO, consult with the PSO regarding plan development and enforcement, issue financial penalties for non-compliance, review annual reports required of the PSO, and track the PSO’s achievement of statutory goals.
Enforcement and MonitoringProducers or PRO will submit an annual report to the state which will be posted on the state website. The government will enforce civil penalties for producers who violate the regulation.A stewardship organization must review and potentially amend its plan at least once every five years. The amendments must be approved by the state. The state may conduct an audit of a stewardship organization if necessary.The state will serve in a supervisory capacity over the actions of a registered responsible party or stewardship organization. This includes reviewing the actions of the responsible party or stewardship organization to ensure that they are reasonable, necessary, and limited to carrying out requirements of and policy established by this regulation.The state must implement, administer, and enforce the requirements of this legislation.The state may require a PRO to revise its plan more frequently than every five years. Reasons for this include failure to achieve requirements or significant changes to the regulatory or economic environment. The state is authorized to enforce civil penalties.A PRO must submit an annual report on the development, implementation and operation of the program by July 1 of each year. By April 1 of each year, or by a later date as determined by the state, an extended producer responsibility organization shall provide a report for review by the department that details how the plan was implemented during the previous calendar year.If the state determines the PRO's plan is not operating within the conditions set within the plan, the state can require amendments or corrective actions.The Administrator may require a revision to a plan if the performance targets are not being met or there is a change in circumstances that otherwise warrants a revision.The state will administer and enforce this regulation and may any rules adopt rules necessary to implementation.The state will administer and enforce this regulation and adopt rules to implement, administer, and enforce this regulation. The state will administer and enforce this regulation and adopt rules to implement, administer, and enforce this regulation. This proposal mentions cost coverage for government oversight, compliance, and enforcement, but does not specify details on these roles.Producers or PRO will submit an annual report to the state which will be posted on the state website. The government will enforce civil penalties for producers who violate the regulation.Producers or PRO will submit an annual report to the state which will be posted on the state website. The government will enforce civil penalties for producers who violate the regulation.Producers or PRO will submit an annual report to the state which will be posted on the state website. The government will enforce civil penalties for producers who violate the regulation.If the state has required a producer or PRO to revise their plan or meet additional measures due to failure to meet required rates established under the plan, the state may take corrective action to address the defaults or deficiencies and impose penalties.The state must implement, administer, and enforce the requirements of this legislation.The state has the power to enter and inspect, at any reasonable time, any public or private property, premises or place for the purpose of investigating either an actual or suspected violation of this bill. A PRO must retain records for no less than 5 years and must make them available to the department. The state has the power to enter and inspect, at any reasonable time, any public or private property, premises, or place for the purpose of investigating either an actual or suspected violation of this bill. A PRO must retain records for no less than 5 years and must make them available to the department.The appropriate state or federal government agency would handle enforcement and penalties.
Fund AllocationReimbursements received from a PRO will be deposited into a dedicated account established for that PRO. These funds will be available to the Administrator for activities of the Administrator associated with overseeing the product stewardship plan and program.The state will determine program rules to include the fee schedule, municipal reimbursement provisions, and distribution of funds to support investments in infrastructure and education.The state will determine program rules to include the fee schedule, municipal reimbursement provisions, and distribution of funds to support investments in infrastructure and education. The state will solicit input from interested parties in the development of any draft rules, solicit public comment on the draft rules for a period of at least 30 days, and hold a public hearing on the draft rules.The state will have funds appropriated to them for administrative costs through a distinct fund.
Enforcement
Reporting RequirementsEach producer or PRO must submit a report annually. The report must cover operational methods, convenience assessment, status in achieving targets, program costs, weight and type of materials collected, audit results, educational efforts, and infrastructure and market developments.Stewardship organizations are required to submit an annual report to the state. Additionally, a stewardship organization is required to register all producers to California's Recycling and Disposal reporting system. The producers must disclose their 2019 baseline units sold, distributed, or imported.EMF states that failure to provide consistent enforcement undermines performance and creates unfair advantages for those who do not meet their obligations. The paper emphasizes the importance of gathering data and constantly monitoring the performance to allow for appropriate adjustments to achieve objectives and targets.At the end of each program year, a stewardship organization implementing a program plan must submit an annual report to the state.Each PRO will submit an annual report to the state beginning in 2026.Each PRO is required to submit an annual report to the state for the preceding calendar year of plan implementation.An extended producer responsibility organization must prepare and submit a plan every two years. Except for an initial plan, a plan submitted under this section must describe how the extended producer responsibility organization consulted with stakeholders and incorporated stakeholder feedback into its plan.Producers must submit yearly progress reports to the state.A producer must report the total tons of each type of packaging material sold or distributed in the state to a PRO including, the methodology for calculation. The PRO must include in its plan how the organization intends to fund representative third-party, independent audits of both inbound and outbound recyclable material generated in Massachusetts annually. The PRO is required to submit an annual report to the state. The schedule will be determined by the state.Each PRO must annually publish a report that covers various aspects of the program, including the quantity of materials sold, recycling rates, contamination data, and information regarding collection opportunities. A yearly report will be submitted to Congress detailing the amount reimbursements received from a PRO.Beginning one calendar year following the effective date of the contract, the stewardship organization must submit a report to the state and make the report available on a publicly accessible website.The stewardship organization must submit an annual report; the timing of that report will be determined during rulemaking.Each producer or PRO must submit a report annually. The report must cover operational methods, convenience assessment, status in achieving targets, program costs, weight and type of materials collected, audit results, educational efforts, and infrastructure and market developments.Each producer or PRO must submit a report annually. The report must cover operational methods, convenience assessment, status in achieving targets, program costs, weight and type of materials collected, audit results, educational efforts, and infrastructure and market developments.Each producer or PRO must submit a report annually. The report must cover operational methods, convenience assessment, status in achieving targets, program costs, weight and type of materials collected, audit results, educational efforts, and infrastructure and market developments.Each producer or PRO must submit a report annually. The report must cover operational methods, convenience assessment, status in achieving targets, program costs, weight and type of materials collected, audit results, educational efforts, and infrastructure and market developments.A stewardship organization must submit an annual report to the state by April 1st each year. Producers must submit a yearly report that evaluates the progress made toward meeting stewardship plan requirements and goals for the immediately preceding year.The program plan must be reviewed and updated at least once every five years. In addition, the PRO is required to submit an annual evaluation report to the department.Each PRO will submit an annual report to the state beginning in 2026.No later than July 1 of each year, a PRO must submit an annual report on the development, implementation and operation of the producer responsibility program to the state for approval. No later than July 1 of each year, a PRO must submit an annual report on the development, implementation, and operation of the producer responsibility program to the state for approval. The PSO would be required to submit an annual report to the state or federal agency showing the progress of the plan toward meeting the statutory goals.
PenaltiesCivil penalties apply to producers who do not comply with the regulation.Producers will be fined per unit sold if not in compliance. Penalties are $0.01 for hard to recycle or hard to compost single-use packaging and single-use products, $0.02 for non-recyclable or non-compostable single-use packaging and single-use products, and, additionally, beginning in 2035, of $0.01 for single-use packaging and single-use products that do not include 75% post-consumer postconsumer recycled content. If a producer is not in compliance the civil penalties will not exceed $50,000 per day, per violation.The state may administratively impose a civil penalty of up to $1,000 per violation per day on anyone who violates this regulation, and up to $10,000 per violation per day on any person who intentionally, knowingly, or negligently violates this regulation.There is civil penalty of up to $10,000 per violation per day on any person who violates this regulation.Civil penalties will not exceed $25,000 for each violation.The penalties are not to exceed $100 per day for violation of program provisions by retailer and penalty not to exceed $25,000 per day for violation by producer or extended producer responsibility organization. Civil penalties will apply based on the number of violations.Responsible parties that violate the requirements in this legislation are subject to a civil penalty.Civil penalties apply to producers who do not comply with the regulation.Civil penalties apply to producers who do not comply with the regulation.Civil penalties apply to producers who do not comply with the regulation.Civil penalties apply to producers who do not comply with the regulation.Any violations will result in penalty that will not exceed $10,000 a day for each violation. A producer or stewardship organization that violates this regulation will be charged penalties based on the number of violations. The penalty is $5,000 for a first violation, $10,000 for a second violation, and $20,000 for a third violation.If a producer is not participating in a PRO within 18 months of the effective date, that producer is not to sell, offer for sale, distribute, or import for sale or distribution in the state, any packaging products. If this is violated the state can authorize penalties of not less than $5,000 and not more than $10,000 for each violation per day.The state may administratively impose a civil penalty of up to $1,000 per violation per day on anyone who violates this regulation, and up to $10,000 per violation per day on any person who intentionally, knowingly, or negligently violates this regulation.The appropriate state or federal government agency would handle enforcement and penalties.
Education and Outreach
Product LabelingThe PRO must have a plan to work with producers to label covered products with information to assist consumers in responsibly managing and recycling covered materials.The education and outreach program plan will include how labels will be used to educate consumers about proper end-of-life management of covered materials and how labeling will improve over time, including the creation of consistent labeling standards.The PRO must include consistent statewide, easy to understand, and accessible recycling instructions in the public outreach, education, and communications.Outreach and education efforts must working with program participants to label covered products and beverage containers with information to assist consumers in responsibly managing covered product and beverage container waste.The PRO must have a plan to work with producers to label covered products with information to assist consumers in responsibly managing and recycling covered materials.The PRO must have a plan to work with producers to label covered products with information to assist consumers in responsibly managing and recycling covered materials.The PRO must have a plan to work with producers to label covered products with information to assist consumers in responsibly managing and recycling covered materials.The PRO must have a plan to work with producers to label covered products with information to assist consumers in responsibly managing and recycling covered materials.The PRO must provide instructions to customers on how to recycle or compost discarded packaging.This position states that areas of focus for state and local governments should include accurate product and bin labeling.
End-of-Life InstructionsEducation, outreach, and communication must cover proper end-of-life management of covered products and beverage containers. The recycling and composting instructions must be consistent statewide (unless exceptions exist), easy to understand, and easily accessible.A stewardship plan and budget shall include measures for education and outreach for waste reduction, post-consumer recycling material, recycling, and composting.Education and outreach messaging will include what materials are recyclable and any special handling considerations associated with covered materials.The education and outreach materials covered under the plans must use consistent and easy to understand messaging statewide adapted to the diverse communities of the state, with the aim of reducing resident confusion regarding the recyclability and end-of-life management options available for different covered products.The education and outreach component of a PRO's plan must use consistent and easy to understand messaging and education with the aim of reducing resident confusion regarding the recyclability and end-of-life management options available for different covered products.The education and outreach materials must include education on the importance of not placing contaminants in commingled recycling systems. Education and outreach will be addressed in plan, but must promote proper end of life management of covered materials, and provide recycling and compost instructions (consistent statewide, easy to understand, easily accessible).The PRO must include promotion of the proper end-of-life management in the public outreach, education, and communications.The product stewardship program must include provisions for outreach and education to consumers throughout the United States regarding the proper end-of-life management of covered products. Recycling and composting instructions must be consistent nationwide, except as necessary, easy to understand, and easily accessible, including accessibility in multiple languages to reach a diverse ethnic population.Education, outreach, and communication must cover proper end-of-life management of covered products and beverage containers. The recycling and composting instructions must be consistent statewide (unless exceptions exist), easy to understand, and easily accessible.Education, outreach, and communication must cover proper end-of-life management of covered materials and products. The recycling and composting instructions must be consistent statewide (unless exceptions exist), easy to understand, and easily accessible.Education, outreach, and communication must cover proper end-of-life management of covered materials and products. The recycling and composting instructions must be consistent statewide (unless exceptions exist), easy to understand, and easily accessible.Education, outreach, and communication must cover proper end-of-life management of covered materials and products. The recycling and composting instructions must be consistent statewide (unless exceptions exist), easy to understand, and easily accessible.Public outreach, education, and communication must promote the proper end-of-life management of covered materials and products and provide recycling and composting instructions.The PRO must include information about the proper end-of-life management including recycling and other environmentally sound disposal options available under the plan, and the location and availability of curbside and drop-off collection opportunities.The education and outreach materials covered under the plans must use consistent and easy to understand messaging statewide adapted to the diverse communities of the state, with the aim of reducing resident confusion regarding the recyclability and end-of-life management options available for different covered products.The program plan requires PRO-developed resources and materials to include how to properly prepare materials for recycling, education on the importance of not placing contaminants in commingled recycling collection, and container signs or decals.The program plan requires PRO-developed resources and materials to include how to properly prepare materials for recycling, education on the importance of not placing contaminants in commingled recycling collection, and container signs or decals.Fees would cover consumer education and outreach programs, including mailers, digital media, cart-tagging, and more, to consistently and adequately promote correct recycling behaviors and improve the quantity and quality of recyclable materials collected.
Litter Prevention CampaignsEducation, outreach, and communication must cover how to prevent litter of covered products and beverage containers.A stewardship plan and budget shall include measures for litter prevention and cleanup measures.The PRO must include in the plan how they will abate and remove litter from public spaces, including the ocean and public parks.Education and outreach must cover litter prevention.The PRO must include promotion of how to prevent litter in the public outreach, education, and communications.Education and outreach must be provided regarding how to prevent litter of covered products and beverage containers.Education, outreach, and communication must cover how to prevent litter of covered products and beverage containers.Education, outreach, and communication must cover how to prevent litter of covered materials.Education, outreach, and communication must cover how to prevent litter of covered materials in the process of collection.Education, outreach, and communication must cover how to prevent litter of covered materials in the process of collection.Public outreach, education, and communication must provide information on how to prevent litter of covered materials and products.The PRO must encourage consumers to avoid littering and explain the environmental impacts with improper disposal.No later than July 1, 2028, a PRO shall establish and implement a program to clean up and prevent litter and marine debris. A PRO’s litter prevention program shall provide grants or direct payments to eligible entities to carry out litter and marine debris prevention, cleanup, and research.
Program AwarenessConsumers must be made aware of the location and availability of curbside and drop-off collection opportunities.The education and outreach program will include a website and consistent statewide messaging to notify the public that there is a free collection program for covered materials. The messaging must include how the stewardship organization will collect covered materials, how to access collection programs and services, and the location and hours of operation of collection points.Education and outreach materials must inform producers and retailers about their obligation to sell only covered products of producers participating in an approved plan.The PRO is responsible for developing and providing outreach and educational materials about the program to be used by retailers, collectors, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations.The PRO must provide public outreach and education, including: communication programs for responding to questions and outreach to local governments to ensure accurate and consistent information across the state.Education must be designed to achieve goals, coordinated across programs, and developed in consultation with governments and stakeholders.Education and outreach must include information concerning the location and availability of curbside and drop-off collection opportunities.The stewardship organization will consider grant proposals designed to increase consumer education in the state regarding accessing recycling infrastructure and reducing contamination in recycling.Consumers must be made aware of the location and availability of curbside and drop-off collection opportunities.Consumers must be made aware of the location and availability of curbside and drop-off collection opportunities. Outreach and education materials must incorporate, at a minimum, electronic, print, web-based, and social media elements that municipalities could utilize at their discretion.Consumers must be made aware of the location and availability of curbside and drop-off collection opportunities. Outreach and education materials must incorporate, at a minimum, electronic, print, web-based, and social media elements that municipalities could utilize at their discretion.Consumers must be made aware of the location and availability of curbside and drop-off collection opportunities. Outreach and education materials must incorporate, at a minimum, electronic, print, web-based, and social media elements that municipalities could utilize at their discretion.Education and outreach materials must inform producers and retailers about their obligation to sell only covered products of producers participating in an approved plan.The program plan must include a communications program for responding to questions involving the uniform statewide collection list, recycling services, and outreach to local governments to ensure information is accurate and consistent across the state. The program plan must include a communications program for responding to questions involving the uniform statewide collection list, recycling services, and outreach to local governments to ensure information is accurate and consistent across the state. This position states that areas of focus for state and local governments should include expanded recycling education.
Shared Responsibility of Government and PROCities and counties may carry out resident education and outreach consistent with producer plan provisions and be reimbursed for the costs of these initiatives, subject to mutual agreement between the jurisdiction and the producer responsibility organization, using an approach specified in the plan.A producer responsibility organization shall, in consultation with local governments, develop educational resources. Outreach and education efforts must include coordinating with and assisting local municipal programs, municipal contracted programs, solid waste collection companies, and other entities providing services.The PRO must notify consumers that participating producers will be responsible for covering the costs of implementing the stewardship plan.Cities and counties may carry out resident education and outreach consistent with producer plan provisions and be reimbursed for the costs of these initiatives, subject to mutual agreement between the jurisdiction and the producer responsibility organization, using an approach specified in the plan.
Sole Responsibility of PROThe producer or PRO shall consult with municipalities on the development of educational materials and may coordinate with municipalities on outreach and communication.The program plan must cover an education and outreach program that may include media advertising, retail displays, articles in trade and other journals and publications, and other public educational efforts.Counties may carry out resident education and outreach and be reimbursed for the costs of these initiatives, but they are not required to.The producer or PRO shall consult with municipalities on the development of educational materials and may coordinate with municipalities on outreach and communication.The producer or producer responsibility organization shall consult with municipalities on the development of educational materials and may coordinate with municipalities on outreach and communication.The producer or PRO shall consult with municipalities on the development of educational materials and may coordinate with municipalities on outreach and communication.The producer or PRO shall consult with municipalities on the development of educational materials and may coordinate with municipalities on outreach and communication.
Stakeholder Involvement
Required Consultation During Plan DevelopmentThe producer must consult with stakeholders and provide an opportunity for stakeholder input prior to submission of the plan.The position states that broad stakeholder consultation from across the value chain and local government can help to enhance the acceptability, transparency, and effectiveness of the EPR scheme.The state will establish a process for public review and comment for program plans. The state will consult with interested persons, including responsible parties, environmental advocacy groups, wholesalers, municipalities, and solid waste management entities.The PRO must document all comments received and responsive answers from stakeholders as an appendix submitted in annual reports, plan updates, and revisions.PROs must allow opportunities for all stakeholders and members of the public to provide comment on the plan prior to its submission.Stakeholder comments must be considered in the development of a stewardship plan.A PRO must provide an annual process to receive comments from additional stakeholders and community members, which to the maximum extent practicable must include diverse ethnic populations.The position states that if proposed EPR legislation includes a producer responsibility organization (PRO) structure, ISRI would evaluate the state’s proposal for an EPR program and seek to ensure industry’s interests are considered.The state recycling program committee will provide input regarding the plan and operation of the stewardship program. The stewardship plan committee will conduct a statewide recycling needs assessment and will also be involved in developing the stewardship program plan.The stewardship organization bid must include a description of how the bidder intends to solicit and consider input from stakeholders, including producers, municipalities, environmental organizations, and waste management and recycling establishments, regarding the bidder's operation of the packaging stewardship program.Many program details will be determined during the rulemaking process, which is designed to ensure the consideration of all input from stakeholders. The rulemaking process will define the following: a process for determining producer payments; producer reporting requirements; a process for determining which types of packaging are considered readily recyclable; a process for determining which municipalities are similar municipalities; a process for determining municipal reimbursements; municipal reporting requirements; requirements for the assessment for program performance; methods for performing audits of recycling, solid waste, and litter; a schedule for reporting by the stewardship organization; and a process for reviewing proposed investments for recycling infrastructure and education. The stewardship organization will be required to solicit and incorporate input from producers, recycling establishments, and participating municipalities during the development of proposals for investments in infrastructure and education, as will be further defined during rulemaking.NWRA's preferred model for EPR is a Stewardship Responsibility Organization (SRO) system that is inclusive of the recycling supply chain. The position states that the SRO should be made up of equal representation from state government, local government, recycling collectors, recycling processors, and producers/brands, to ensure consideration of the entire value chain.The producer must consult with stakeholders and provide an opportunity for stakeholder input prior to submission of the plan.The producer responsibility plan must include a description of how comments of stakeholders were considered and addressed in the development of the plan. The PRO must consult stakeholders, including municipalities, private sector haulers, material recovery facilities, and processors.Producer responsibility plans must be submitted to an advisory board, which will determine if it meets the criteria of the legislation. Plans must include a detailed description of how the producer or PRO consulted with the advisory board in the development of the plan and to what extent the advisory board's input was incorporated.Producer responsibility plans must be submitted to an advisory board, which will determine if it meets the criteria of the legislation. Plans must include a detailed description of how the producer or PRO consulted with the advisory board in the development of the plan and to what extent the advisory board's input was incorporated.The stewardship plan must be developed in consultation with local governments and other stakeholders, and the plan must describe how stakeholder comments were considered during development.The PRO must describe the process used during plan development to engage various stakeholders, in addition to the comments from stakeholders and how the PRO addressed the comments.The PRO must document all comments received and responsive answers from stakeholders as an appendix submitted in annual reports, plan updates, and revisions.The Oregon Recycling System Advisory Council (ORSAC) will advise the state and PRO(s) on issues related to the implementation of the legislation like review producer responsibility program plans, plan amendments and program reports, make recommendations to state and the PRO(s) related to the establishment and maintenance of the list of specifically identified materials.The Oregon Recycling System Advisory Council (ORSAC) will advise the state and PRO(s) on issues related to the implementation of the legislation like review producer responsibility program plans, plan amendments and program reports, make recommendations to state and the PRO(s) related to the establishment and maintenance of the list of specifically identified materials.
Stakeholder Advisory CommitteeA Packaging and Paper Product Stewardship Program Advisory Council will be created to provide advice to the state and responsible parties or stewardship organizations in the development of a program plan and to oversee and provide recommendations for the implementation of a program plan. The Advisory Council will be composed of 13 members appointed by the state and equitably representing all supply chain participants in the recycling system. Members of the Advisory Council must include the following: 1. Two individuals representing national associations of packaging producers. 2. Two individuals representing material recovery facilities. 3. Two individuals representing waste haulers. 4. Two individuals representing county or municipal government waste management programs. 5. One individual representing a statewide association representing retailers. 6. One individual representing a statewide environmental organization. 7. One individual representing a community-based organization or an organization representing equity and underrepresented stakeholders. 8. One individual representing a privately owned transfer station or drop-off center that collects recyclables from the public. 9. One individual representing a publicly owned transfer station or drop-off center that collects recyclables from the public.Each producer and PRO must establish an advisory committee composed of stakeholders relevant to the program's covered products and state residents. The advisory committee will be consulted at least annually and inform the covered material list and other program aspects. The committee will include at least one member from each of the following groups: 1. Cities, including a representative located in east and west of the Cascade mountains from: (i) Small and large cities; and (ii) Cities located in urban and rural counties 2. Counties, including a representative located in east and west of the Cascade mountains from: (i) Geographically small and large counties; and (ii) Urban and rural counties 3. Indian tribes 4. Public sector recycling and solid waste industries 5. Private sector recycling and solid waste industries 6. Public or private reuse and waste prevention organizations 7. Recycled plastic and paper feedstock users 8. Public place recycling programs 9. Freshwater and marine litter programs 10. Environmental organizations 11. Consumer organizations 12. Communities that bear disproportionately higher levels of adverse environmental impacts.PROs are required to establish an advisory committee. At a minimum, the advisory committee must include at least one person representing each of the following: 1. The county in which the producer or producer responsibility organization is located. 2. Public sector recycling and solid waste industries. 3. Private sector recycling and solid waste industries. 4. Public or private reuse and waste prevention organizations. 5. Recycled plastic and paper feedstock users. 6. Public place recycling programs. 7. Freshwater and marine litter programs. 8. Environmental organizations. 9. Consumer organizations. 10. Communities that bear disproportionately higher levels of adverse environmental impacts.This bill establishes an advisory council to represent the recycling system stakeholders. The group includes local governments, community organizations, small businesses not in the recycling industry, non-profits, and recycling industry persons. The council members are appointed by the governor.The state will appoint 10 members to an EPR program advisory committee.The PRO is required to establish an advisory committee.Each PRO must establish an advisory committee that represents relevant stakeholders, including collection providers, cleanup service providers, recyclers, composters, and governmental entities. An advisory committee will prepare a plan for the PRO and submit it to the PRO for review and approval. At a minimum, an advisory committee must include individuals representing each of the following: 1. Responsible parties, such as a trade association 2. States 3. Cities, including small and large cities and cities located in urban and rural counties 4. Counties, including small and large counties and urban and rural counties 5. Public sector recycling, composting, and solid waste industries for the applicable type of product or packaging 6. Private sector recycling, composting, and solid waste industries for the applicable type of product or packaging 7. Recycled feedstock users for the applicable type of product or packaging 8. Public place litter programs 9. Freshwater and marine litter programs 10. Environmental organizations 11. Disability advocates 12. Indian Tribes 13. Environmental and human health scientistsThe stewardship organization(s) will establish a state recycling program committee composed of stakeholders. The committee must include an individual with expertise in the development of recycling markets, the operator of a recycling facility, a representative of a regional waste management and recycling organization, a representative of the composting industry, a representative of a nonprofit environmental advocacy organization, an individual with expertise in consumer education and an individual with expertise in advanced recycling technology. The stewardship organization(s) will also establish a stewardship plan committer. The committee will conduct a statewide recycling needs assessment and will be involved in developing the stewardship program plan. The committee must include representation from responsible parties, manufacturers of packaging material, retailers, municipalities, waste and recycling collectors and transporters, recycling and composting facilities, and other entities, which may include consultants.This position suggests that a multi-stakeholder advisory board can provide input to all aspects of the program plan.This bill requires the establishment of a producer responsibility advisory board, to receive and review the producer responsibility plans and make recommendations regarding the plan's approval. The advisory board must be composed of an odd number of members, with at least one member from each of the following: 1. A municipality association or municipal recycling program, including an additional municipal representative from cities with a population of one million or more residents. 2. A statewide environmental organization. 3. A representative of environmental justice communities or organizations. 4. A statewide waste disposal association. 5. A materials recovery facility located within the state of New York. 6. A recycling collection provider. 7. A manufacturer of packaging materials utilizing post-consumer recycled content. 8. A manufacturer of paper materials utilizing post-consumer recycled content. 9. A consumer advocate. 10. A retailer.This bill requires the establishment of a producer responsibility advisory board, to receive and review the producer responsibility plans and make recommendations regarding the plan's approval. The advisory board must be composed of an odd number of members, with at least one member from each of the following: 1. A municipality association or municipal recycling program, including an additional municipal representative from cities with a population of one million or more residents. 2. A statewide environmental organization. 3. A representative of environmental justice communities or organizations. 4. A statewide waste disposal association. 5. A materials recovery facility located within the state of New York. 6. A recycling collection provider. 7. A manufacturer of packaging materials utilizing post-consumer recycled content. 8. A manufacturer of paper materials utilizing post-consumer recycled content. 9. A consumer advocate. 10. A retailer. 11. A public health specialist. 12. A producer or PRO (as non-voting members).Each producer and PRO must establish an advisory committee composed of stakeholders relevant to the program's covered products and state residents. The advisory committee will be consulted at least annually and inform the covered material list and other program aspects. The committee will include at least one member from each of the following groups: 1. Cities, including a representative located in east and west of the Cascade mountains from: (i) Small and large cities; and (ii) Cities located in urban and rural counties 2. Counties, including a representative located in east and west of the Cascade mountains from: (i) Geographically small and large counties; and (ii) Urban and rural counties 3. Indian tribes 4. Public sector recycling and solid waste industries 5. Private sector recycling and solid waste industries 6. Public or private reuse and waste prevention organizations 7. Recycled plastic and paper feedstock users 8. Public place recycling programs 9. Freshwater and marine litter programs 10. Environmental organizations 11. Consumer organizations 12. Communities that bear disproportionately higher levels of adverse environmental impacts.This bill establishes a stakeholder group called The Oregon Recycling System Advisory Council (ORSAC). The council consists of 17 members appointed by the Governor.This bill establishes a stakeholder group called The Oregon Recycling System Advisory Council (ORSAC). The council consists of 17 members appointed by the Governor, one member from the Senate, and one member from the House of Representatives. The two members may not be from the same political party. The Governor must appoint four representatives of local governments, two representatives of community-based organizations representing the interests of historically underserved groups, one owner or operator of a small business, two representatives of environmental nonprofit organizations, four representatives of the recycling industry, including local governments’ service providers, processors or material end users, and four representatives of producers of covered products or producer trade associations or suppliers.
Recyclable/Recycling Definition
Defines "Recyclable""Readily-recyclable" means packaging that can be sorted by entities processing recyclables from New York and for which there was a consistent market during the previous 2 years, and recyclers were willing to accept sorted material. Readily-recyclable does not include material types that recyclers accept in low quantities or sort out of material during additional processing steps. If recyclers do not want a full bale of a specific material type, that material type is not considered readily recyclable.Recyclable means covered materials that can be sorted by entities processing recyclables in Vermont and for which, during the previous two calendar years, there was a consistent market for the reclaimed or processed material to be used in the production of materials or products.Recyclable is defined as a covered product that is regularly collected, separated, and reprocessed into a recycled material, and that does not contain harmful chemical, physical, biological, or radiological substances that will pose a threat to human health or the environment for its intended or likely manner of use. Recyclable is defined as a covered product that is regularly collected, separated, and reprocessed into a recycled material, and that does not contain harmful chemical, physical, biological, or radiological substances that will pose a threat to human health or the environment for its intended or likely manner of use. The bill authorizes the state to develop criteria to determine whether the covered products are reusable, recyclable, or compostable. The criteria development will take into account whether covered products or materials are collected, separated, and processed in sufficient quantity and quality, contain toxic substances, or are designed in a way that is problematic for reuse, recycling, or composting.Recycling means any process by which solid waste materials are transformed into new products in a manner that the original products may lose their identity. Product must be economically and technically recycled in the US, with domestic capacity exceeding increasing percentages over 5 year periods. The product must not require to remove any attached components, such as a label. The product cannot contain a toxic substance.Recyclable is defined to mean covered products or associated packaging materials that meet the criteria and standards set forth in the program plan. The criteria and standards to determine recyclability will be proposed in the plan and must be consistent with applicable national and international recyclability standards including standards set by ASTM International or the International Organization for Standardization.Readily recyclable is defined as a packaging material that can be sorted by facilities within the state and has a consistent market for purchase. Consistent market for purchase means that processors are willing to purchase full bales of that type of fully sorted packaging material in quantities equal to or in excess of the supply of that fully sorted packaging material. Readily recyclable does not include packaging material that are generally accepted only in small quantities.Readily recyclable packaging material will be determined on an annual basis by the state through consultation with the stewardship organization and recycling establishments. The rules determining this process must include a transitional period between the time that a type of packaging material is determined to be readily recyclable or to not be readily recyclable."Readily-recyclable" means packaging that can be sorted by entities processing recyclables from New York and for which there was a consistent market during the previous 2 years, and recyclers were willing to accept sorted material. Readily-recyclable does not include material types that recyclers accept in low quantities or sort out of material during additional processing steps. If recyclers do not want a full bale of a specific material type, that material type is not considered readily recyclable."Readily-recyclable" means packaging that can be sorted by entities processing recyclables from New York and for which there was a consistent market during the previous 2 years, and recyclers were willing to accept sorted material. Readily-recyclable does not include material types that recyclers accept in low quantities or sort out of material during additional processing steps. If recyclers do not want a full bale of a specific material type, that material type is not considered readily recyclable. Readily-recyclable also does not include materials that contain harmful chemical, physical, biological, or radiological substances that pose a threat to human health or the environment for its intended or like manner of use.This bill ties the definition of readily-recyclable to covered materials or products included in the minimum recyclables list. This list will be created by the PRO based on available collection and processing infrastructure and recycling markets for covered materials and products. This list will be updated on an annual basis in response to collection and processing improvements and changes in recycling end markets. Readily-recyclable does not include materials that contain toxic substances.This bill ties the definition of readily-recyclable to covered materials or products included in the minimum recyclables list. This list will be created by the PRO based on available collection and processing infrastructure and recycling markets for covered materials and products. This list will be updated on an annual basis in response to collection and processing improvements and changes in recycling end markets. Readily-recyclable does not include materials that contain toxic substances.Recyclable is defined as a covered product that is regularly collected, separated, and reprocessed into a recycled material, and that does not contain harmful chemical, physical, biological, or radiological substances that will pose a threat to human health or the environment for its intended or likely manner of use.
Defines "Recycling""Recycling" means to separate, dismantle or process the materials, components or commodities contained in covered products for the purpose of preparing the materials, components or commodities for use or reuse in new products or components. "Recycling" does not include energy recovery or energy generation by means of combustion, or landfill disposal of discarded covered products or discarded product component materials.Recycle means the process of reclaiming or processing covered materials to produce new materials or products.Recycled material means material derived from covered products that is reprocessed into products or commodities used in the production of new products whether for the original or another purpose. Recycled material does not include energy recovery and the reprocessing of materials that are to be used as fuels or landfill cover.Recycling is the series of activities by which a material is collected, storted, and processed in a manner that does not change the basic molecular structure. Recycling is defined as to separate, dismantle or process the materials, components or commodities in covered materials for the purpose of preparing the materials, components or commodities for use or reuse in new products or components.Recycling is defined as converting a product to a raw material with minimal loss of quality. That material must be used in the production of a new product, and cannot be used for inferior purposes, as fuel or energy, or in infrastructure projects (pavement, building materials).Recycling is defined in previous state legislation to mean the transforming or remanufacturing of an unwanted product or the unwanted product's components and by-products into usable or marketable materials. Recycling does not include landfill disposal, incineration or energy recovery, or energy generation by means of combusting unwanted products, components, and by-products with or without other waste.This bill refers to the definition of recycling used in existing Maine legislation. Recycling means the transforming or remanufacturing of an unwanted product or the unwanted product's components and by-products into usable or marketable materials. The definition does not include landfill disposal, incineration, energy recovery, or energy generation by means of combusting unwanted products, components, and by-products with or without other waste.This bill refers to the definition of recycling used in existing Maine legislation. Recycling means the transforming or remanufacturing of an unwanted product or the unwanted product's components and by-products into usable or marketable materials. The definition does not include landfill disposal, incineration, energy recovery, or energy generation by means of combusting unwanted products, components, and by-products with or without other waste. "Recycling" means to separate, dismantle or process the materials, components or commodities contained in covered products for the purpose of preparing the materials, components or commodities for use or reuse in new products or components. "Recycling" does not include energy recovery or energy generation by means of combustion, or landfill disposal of discarded covered products or discarded product component materials."Recycling" means to separate, dismantle or process the materials, components or commodities contained in covered products for the purpose of preparing the materials, components or commodities for use or reuse in new products or components. "Recycling" does not include energy recovery or energy generation by means of combustion, or landfill disposal of discarded covered products or discarded product component materials.Recycling is defined as the reprocessing, by means of a manufacturing process, of a used material into a product, a component incorporated into a product, or a secondary (recycled) raw material. It does not include energy recovery or energy generation by means of combustion, use as a fuel, or landfill disposal of discarded covered materials or products or discarded product component materials or chemical conversion processes.Recycling is defined as the reprocessing, by means of a manufacturing process, of a used material into a product, a component incorporated into a product, or a secondary (recycled) raw material. It does not include energy recovery or energy generation by means of combustion, use as a fuel, or landfill disposal of discarded covered materials or products or discarded product component materials or chemical conversion processes.Recycling is a process by which materials or products that would otherwise become solid waste are collected, separated, or processed and returned to the economic mainstream in the form of raw materials or products. Recycling does not include energy recovery or energy generation resulting from combustion or incineration processes.Recycled material means material derived from covered products that is reprocessed into products or commodities used in the production of new products whether for the original or another purpose. Recycled material does not include energy recovery and the reprocessing of materials that are to be used as fuels or landfill cover.Mechanical recycling means a form of recycling that does not change the basic molecular structure of the material being recycled.Mechanical recycling means a form of recycling that does not change the basic molecular structure of the material being recycled.
Excludes Advanced RecyclingPrior to the use of advanced recycling technologies to be counted towards recycling performance targets, the PRO must provide the department with a third-party assessment that examines the impact of the advanced technology on the following: (i) Air and water pollution and release or creation of any hazardous pollutants. (ii) The greenhouse gas emissions resulting from products and processes of the advanced technology facility, taking into account the full life cycle including final use of products.Recycling does not include the conversion of solid waste into alternative products, including chemicals, feedstocks, fuels and energy, through pyrolysis, hydropyrolysis, methanolysis, gasification, enzymatic breakdown, or similar technologies.Recycling does not include energy recovery or energy generation by means of combustion, pyrolysis, gasification, and any other high-heat chemical conversion processes, or landfill disposal of discarded covered products or discarded product component materials.Advanced recycling technologies that convert waste to alternative products, including feedstocks, is not considered recycling.Recycling, for the purpose of this bill, does not include chemical conversion processes.Recycling, for the purpose of this bill, does not include chemical conversion processes that have been determined by the state to not qualify as recycling.Prior to the use of advanced recycling technologies to be counted towards recycling performance targets, the PRO must provide the department with a third-party assessment that examines the impact of the advanced technology on the following: (i) Air and water pollution and release or creation of any hazardous pollutants. (ii) The greenhouse gas emissions resulting from products and processes of the advanced technology facility, taking into account the full life cycle including final use of products.
Other
Antitrust ProtectionThis bill extends antitrust protections to members of a PRO for actions taken in accordance with this regulation.Responsible parties and members of a stewardship organization are protected from antitrust violations for actions taken in accordance with this regulation to the extent that the actions is necessary to plan, implement, and comply with the program plan.Producers participating in a stewardship plan are immune from antitrust regulation liability for activities concerning recycling, reuse, and disposal of covered products and materials.Producers are protected from antitrust liability while carrying out approved program activities, as long as the conduct is necessary to planning and implementation.Responsible parties and members of a stewardship organization are protected from antitrust liability for actions taken in accordance with this regulation to the extent that the actions is necessary to plan and implement the required packaging stewardship program.A producer or stewardship organization are protected from antitrust liability for actions taken in accordance with this regulation to the extent that the actions is necessary to plan and implement the required packaging stewardship program or alternative collection program.A producer or stewardship organization is protected from antitrust liability for actions taken in accordance with this regulation to the extent that the actions are necessary to plan and implement the required packaging stewardship program or alternative collection program.This bill extends antitrust protections to members of a PRO for actions taken in accordance with this regulation.This bill extends antitrust protections to members of a PRO for actions taken in accordance with this regulation.This bill extends antitrust protections to members of a PRO for actions taken in accordance with this regulation.This bill extends antitrust protections to members of a PRO for actions taken in accordance with this regulation.The stewardship organization is exempt from antitrust laws for actions required to develop, implement, and operate the plastics stewardship program.The actions of the producers in the PRO are exempt from antitrust laws, except when the agreement affects the price of a product or that restricts the output or production of a product or the geographic area or customers to which a product will be sold.The position recommends that an antitrust exemption be written into legislation to protect collaboration necessary to implement the PSO and program plan.
Toxic SubstancesThe producer or PRO must ensure covered products are free from toxic substances.The state will establish a toxic substance list and update the list every 3 years. Covered material categories or types shall not be considered readily-recyclable, recyclable, compostable, or reusable if they contain toxic substances.The producer or PRO must ensure covered products are free from toxic substances.
Domestic ProcessingThe producer or PRO must document how they have used domestic and local collection and processing infrastructure.The producer or PRO must document how they have used domestic and local collection and processing infrastructure.
ContaminationThe plan must address contamination from covered products at compost/organics facilities.The plan must address contamination from covered products at compost/organics facilities.The Environmental Quality Commission shall adopt and periodically revise a contamination management fee to be paid by PRO(s) to commingled recycling processing facilities to compensate the facilities for the costs of removing and disposing of covered products that are contaminants.The Environmental Quality Commission shall adopt and periodically revise a contamination management fee to be paid by PRO(s) to commingled recycling processing facilities to compensate the facilities for the costs of removing and disposing of covered products that are contaminants.
Rate MeasurementThis bill specifies how rates are measure for different material categories, including rigid plastic, flexible plastic, paper, aluminum, steel, and glass. The bill also includes measurement methods for all other materials not included in the above categories.This bill specifies how rates are measure for different material categories, including rigid plastic, flexible plastic, paper, aluminum, steel, and glass. The bill also includes measurement methods for all other materials not included in the above categories.SFPA states that federal and local governments can lead the way to prioritize recycling, increase collection, and decrease contamination by setting more consistent standards for accepted materials across regions and collecting, analyzing, and reporting data on U.S. recycling operations.
Greenhouse Gas AssessmentThe producer or PRO must include in their reports an assessment of the greenhouse gas emissions associated with program operations, including both direct emissions and indirect emissions with all activities, and including the avoided emissions from source reduction, reuse, and recycling of covered products into new products and materials.The annual reports from PROs must include an assessment of the greenhouse gas emissions associated with program operations, including both direct emissions and indirect emissions with all activities, and including the avoided emissions from source reduction, reuse, and recycling of covered products into new products and materials.The stewardship organization must include in their annual report an estimate of the annual greenhouse gas emissions effects in the state associated with the operation of the stewardship program.The producer or PRO must include in their reports an assessment of the greenhouse gas emissions associated with program operations, including both direct emissions and indirect emissions with all activities, and including the avoided emissions from source reduction, reuse, and recycling of covered products into new products and materials.
No Point-of-Sale FeesA non-reimbursable point-of-sale fee may not be charged to consumers to recoup the costs of meeting producer obligations.PROs are prohibited from charging consumers with a non-reimbursable point-of-sale fee shall to recoup the costs of meeting producer obligations.A point-of-sale fee may not be charged to consumers by producers to recoup the costs of meeting producer obligations.A point-of-sale fee may not be charged to consumers by a retailer to recoup the costs of meeting producer obligations.A point-of-sale fee may not be charged to consumers by a retailer to recoup the costs of meeting producer obligations.A non-reimbursable point-of-sale fee may not be charged to consumers to recoup the costs of meeting producer obligations.The proposed Packaging and Printed Paper Fee would not be a separate, visible fee to consumers at the point of purchase.
Needs AssessmentThe stewardship plan committee established by the stewardship organization will conduct a statewide recycling needs assessment. This assessment must, at a minimum, include an evaluation of: 1. Current funding needs affecting recycling access and availability in the state. 2. The capacity, costs, and needs associated with the collection and transportation of recyclable material in the state. 3. The processing capacity, market conditions, and opportunities in the state and regionally for recyclable and compostable material. 4. Consumer education needs in the state with respect to recycling and composting and with respect to reducing contamination in collected recyclable and compostable material.The stewardship organization must develop a plan to conduct a statewide recycling needs assessment. The needs assessment will evaluate current funding needs affecting recycling access and availability, the capacity and costs associated with the collection and transportation of recyclable material, the processing capacity, market conditions, and opportunities in the state and regionally for recyclable material, and consumer education needs with respect to recycling and reducing contamination in collected recyclable material.This bill requires a statewide needs assessment to be conducted prior to the approval of a producer responsibility plan. The assessment will be funded by the producers or PRO, and conducted by an independent third party. The assessment will evaluate the capacity, costs, gaps, and needs for the following factors: 1. Current funding needs impacting recycling access and availability. 2. Existing state statutory provisions and funding sources for recycling, reuse, reduction, and recovery. 3. The collection and hauling system for recyclable materials in the state. 4. The processing capacity and infrastructure for recyclable materials in the state and regionally, and necessary capital investments to existing and future reuse and recycling infrastructure. 5. The market conditions and opportunities for recyclable materials in the state and regionally. 6. Consumer education needs for recycling, reuse, and reduction of covered materials and products.This bill requires a statewide needs assessment to be conducted prior to the approval of a producer responsibility plan. The assessment will be funded by the producers or PRO, and conducted by an independent third party. The assessment will evaluate the capacity, costs, gaps, and needs for the following factors: 1. Current funding needs impacting recycling access and availability. 2. Existing state statutory provisions and funding sources for recycling, reuse, reduction, and recovery. 3. The collection and hauling system for recyclable materials in the state. 4. The processing capacity and infrastructure for recyclable materials in the state and regionally, and necessary capital investments to existing and future reuse and recycling infrastructure. 5. The market conditions and opportunities for recyclable materials in the state and regionally. 6. Consumer education needs for recycling, reuse, and reduction of covered materials and products.DEQ shall conduct a statewide needs assessment to identify the contribution of different types of covered products to litter and marine debris in Oregon. The needs assessment may include recommendations for additional PRO responsibilities. If no recommendations are included, DEQ must include an explanation of why PRO responsibilities are not currently needed. The position recommends that funds be distributed toward recycling system improvements based on a quantitative analysis of community needs.The position recommends a thorough assessment of the education and infrastructure needs prior to establishing fee amounts or funding allocations. This assessment should evaluate residential access to recycling services, contamination rates, and Material Recovery Facility (MRF) capabilities., and other relevant factors.
Advertiser OptionProducers who provide advertisement of the program in magazines, newspapers, or websites, may be excluded from program participation as long as the value of the advertisement is equal in value to the cost of participating in the producer responsibility program.
LabelingProducts with a chasing arrow symbol are deemed misleading unless the material is on the statewide collection list.Selling products with deceptive or misleading claims is prohibited. This includes the chasing arrows symbol unless the material of the product is included in the statewide recycling list, or is labeled in accordance with DEQ rules. Producers must include labels on covered products and beverage containers that are easy to read and indicate that the covered product or beverage container is recyclable, not recyclable, compostable, reusable. If a product is not recyclable, it must not include the universal chasing arrows recycling symbol or any other similar symbol that would lead a consumer to believe that the item should be sorted for recycling. Not later than 2 years after the date of enactment of this regulation, the Administrator will establish or approve a standardized label for each category of covered product and beverage container to be used by producers.This bill removes the previous requirement to include the chasing arrows symbol around the Resin Identification Code (RIC) on all plastic bottles or rigid plastic containers.This bill removes the previous requirement to include the chasing arrows symbol around the Resin Identification Code (RIC) on all plastic bottles or rigid plastic containers.This bill repeals the previous state requirement to label all rigid plastic packaging with the chasing arrows symbol. It also creates a legislative task force to study the issue of confusing and misleading labels and produce a report to the legislature by June 1, 2022.
Waste PreventionThis legislation would establish a waste and litter management special fund. All funds received by the department from producer responsibility organizations would be deposited in the special fund for use in implementing, administering, and enforcing waste and litter management programs pursuant to this bill.The state will establish a program to support waste prevention and the reuse of covered products that might otherwise become solid waste.Every 2 years, the Administrator will conduct an audit of collection and recycling to provide an accounting of the collection and recycling of covered products and beverage containers that are not produced by a PRO and covered products and beverage containers of brand names found in litter to provide for an accounting of covered products and other litter that continues to create pollution.
Life Cycle AssessmentMembers of PRO must complete a LCA of covered packaging and publicly share results with the department.
Statewide ListThe state, in consultation with the PRO and the Advisory Council will develop the uniform statewide collection list, in addition to the methods for collection.A PRO program plan must include a statewide recycling list consisting of covered products that are appropriate for recycling throughout the state. The Environmental Quality commission will identify plastics that are suitable for recycling in the state. They will take into consideration: end markets, health and safety, yield loss, compatibility with existing infrastructure, amount, practicality of sortation, contamination, economics, and life cycle assessments.
Material ExemptionA producer may demonstrate to the department that a material is exempt from the requirements for a covered product if the material is collected through a recycling collection service not provided under the opportunity to recycle, does not undergo separation from other materials at a commingled recycling processing facility, and is recycled at a responsible end market. If only a portion of the material sold in or into this state by a producer meets the criteria, the portion that meets the criteria is exempt and the portion that does not meet the criteria is a covered product.A producer may demonstrate to the department that a material is exempt from the requirements for a covered product if the material is collected through a recycling collection service not provided under the opportunity to recycle, does not undergo separation from other materials at a commingled recycling processing facility, and is recycled at a responsible end market. If only a portion of the material sold in or into this state by a producer meets the criteria, the portion that meets the criteria is exempt and the portion that does not meet the criteria is a covered product.
Processor Commodity Risk FeeThe Environmental Quality Commission shall adopt and periodically revise a processor commodity risk fee to be paid by PRO(s) to commingled recycling processing facilities to ensure that producers share in the costs of fully processing commingled recyclables that are covered products and to allow local governments to reduce the financial impacts on ratepayers. The processor commodity risk fee shall be based on the eligible processing costs of facilities less the average commodity value of recyclable materials processed by facilities.The Environmental Quality Commission shall adopt and periodically revise a processor commodity risk fee to be paid by PRO(s) to commingled recycling processing facilities to ensure that producers share in the costs of fully processing commingled recyclables that are covered products and to allow local governments to reduce the financial impacts on ratepayers. The processor commodity risk fee shall be based on the eligible processing costs of facilities less the average commodity value of recyclable materials processed by facilities.
Single-Use DefinitionSingle-use packaging means the packaging of a product made partially or entirely of plastic and that meets both of the following: 1. The packaging is routinely recycled, disposed of, or discarded after its contents have been used or unpackaged. 2. The packaging is typically not refilled by the producer. Single-use packaging does not include reusable packaging. Single-use product means single-use food service ware, including plates, bowls, cups, utensils, stirrers, and straws made partially or entirely of plastic.
Defines "Reusable"Reusable is defined as covered materials that meets both of the following requirements: (A) Is technically feasible to reuse for its original purpose by the consumer, is capable of being refilled with materials available to the consumer, or is collected and refilled by the producer. (B) Is reusable or refillable for an appropriate number of cycles depending on the material, but not less than 100 cycles.
EPR StudyThis bill would require a study on the benefits and costs to implement extended producer responsibility in the state.The study would analyze and evaluate the following: 1. The implementation of EPR in the state independent of other state and federal packaging EPR initiatives. 2. The implementation of EPR packaging in the state in conjunction or synchronicity with other state and federal initiatives. 3. The best science available relating to EPR and best packaging practices. 4. The costs and benefits to all stakeholders, including but not limited to the environment, consumers, taxpayers, government, and businesses. 5. The potential benefits and drawbacks of implementing EPR for packaging in the state. 6. The feasibility of implementing EPR for packaging in the state. 7. The projected timeline for the implementation of EPR for packaging in the state. 8. The expected savings, if any, for the state and counties in costs relating to waste management and recycling in the implementation of EPR packaging in the state. 9. Any other issues the department deems relevant.This bill would require the Department of Environmental Quality to study and make recommendations for modernizing Oregon’s recycling system. The department must provide the results of the study and recommendations in a report to the appropriate interim committees of the Legislative Assembly no later than September 15, 2022.
Check-Off ProgramAn additional financing mechanism presented is a check-off program. In this type of program, relevant private industries would voluntarily contribute set amount of funds annually for consumer education.
Virgin Resin FeeThe policy position also presents a fee for virgin resin with the intent of creating price parity with recycled resin to make it more cost effective for use in packaging.
Alternative Collection ProgramsA producer or group of producers may develop and operate an alternative collection program to collect and manage a type or types of packaging material. A producer that manages a type of packaging material under an approved alternative collection program may wholly or partially offset the producer's payment obligations under the packaging stewardship program with respect to that same type of packaging material only.A producer or group of producers may develop and operate an alternative collection program to collect and manage a type or types of packaging material. A producer that manages a type of packaging material under an approved alternative collection program may wholly or partially offset the producer's payment obligations under the packaging stewardship program with respect to that same type of packaging material only.
Receptacle LabelingThe bill includes a section that establishes guidelines for a national standardized labeling system for the development of labels for recycling and composting receptacles that use a methodology that is consistent throughout the United States to assist members of the public in properly recycling and composting.
Recyclable CategoriesBy July 1, 2022 the department will determine what single-use packaging and products are easily recyclable and easily compostable. The determination will include if single-use packaging and single-use products are easily recyclable or easily compostable, hard to recycle or hard to compost, or non-recyclable or non-compostable.
Relief from Previous RestrictionsAmends previous recycling laws in OR to allow PRO to provide collection and education to municipalities.
Advanced Recycling ConsiderationsThe position states that all forms of recycling – including mechanical, chemical and organic – should be considered when developing and implementing financing systems to assist with recycling system needs and goals.The bill includes considerations for the use of advanced recycling technologies and the ability to count that type of conversion towards performance targets. The PRO must provide the state with a third-party assessment on the impact of the advanced technology, including pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.
Waste AuditsThe stewardship organization will be required to conduct representative audits of recyclable material processed and sold by facilities in the state and municipal solid waste disposed of or waste littered in the state.
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